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Bibliografická citace

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(3.5) Půjčeno:7x 
BK
Thousand Oaks : Sage, 2004
xviii,300 s. : il.

ISBN 0-7619-2798-0 (brož.)
Obsahuje rejstřík, bibliografické odkazy
Identita kulturní - vyprávění (sociologie) - studie
Vyprávění (sociologie) - studie
000066830
Editors’ Introduction: Theory and Craft in Narrative Inquiry Colette Daiute and Cynthia Lightfoot // Part I: Literary Readings // 1.1 The Role of Imagination in Narrative Construction // Theodore R. Sarbin // 1.2 Fantastic Self: A Study of Adolescents’ Fictional Narratives, and Aesthetic Activity as Identity Work // Cynthia Lightfoot // 1.3 Cultural Modeling as a Frame for Narrative Analysis // Carol D. Lee, Erica Rosenfeld, // Ruby Mendenhall, Ama Rivers, and Brendesha Tynes // 1.4 Data Are Everywhere: Narrative Criticism in the Literature of Experience // Mark Freeman // Part II: Social-Relational Readings // 2.1 Construction of the Cultural Self in Early Narratives // Katherine Nelson // 2.2 Creative Uses of Cultural Genres // Colette Daiute // 2.3 Positioning With Davie Hogan: Stories, Tellings, and Identities // Michael Bamberg // 2.4 Dilemmas of Storytelling and Identity // Steven Stanley and Michael Billig // Part KK: Readings Through the Forces of History // 177 // 3.1 Narrating and Counternarrating Illegality as an Identity // Jocelyn Solis // 3.2 Transcendent Stories and Counternarratives in Holocaust SurvivorLife Histories: Searching for Meaning in Video-Testimony Archives // Sarah K. Carney // 3.3 Women of “The Greatest Generation”: // Feeling on the Margin of Social History // Abigail J. Stewart and Janet E. Malley // 3.4 Culture, Continuity, and the Limits of Narrativity: // A Comparison of the Self-Narratives of Native and Non-Native Youth // Michael J. Chandler, Christopher E. Lalonde, and Ulrich Teucher // 3.5 Once Upon a Time: A Narratologist’s Tale // Mary Gergen // Index // About the Editors // About the Contributors
INDEX :  Aboriginal peoples. See Native/ non-native youth narratives Adolescents // authority and, 35 historical “selves” and, 23-26 narrative form and, 30-34 risk-taking and, 22-23 self-concept and identity development, 3, xv selves in fiction writing and, 26-35 time/conflict and, 27-30 Adventure story, 27-28 African American Discourse Features (AADF), 47-51 African American English (AAE) cultural referents and, 51-56 differing views on, 40 field dependent style and, 47-50 research site for, 46-47 sermonic tones and, 51-52, // 55-56 speech genres within, 44 African American Rhetorical // Tradition, 41-46, 56. See also Cultural conventions African American Vernacular English (AAVE), 40, 46, 57 Angel Child, Dragon Child, 117, 128 Aphorisms and African American Rhetorical Tradition, 41 “As if” behavior and imagination, 11-14 // Asociación Tepeyac, 181-182. // See also Illegality narration/counternarration // Assumptions and illegality narration, 186 Attenuated approach. See Embodiments Audiences // illegality narration and, 189 storytelling and, 137 Authority and adolescents, 35 Autobiographies. See also Holocaust survivor life histories conflict and, 124-126 of contemporary heroism, 272 cultural self and, 24 and legitimizing data
for narrative analysis, 71-78 Autonomy. See Doctoral education Avoidance movements. See Embodiments // Believing v. imagining, 17-18 Biblical verses and African American Rhetorical Tradition, 41 Buchner, George, 25 // Cartesian dualism, 9-10 Centering self, 115, 124-125, 130-131 Characterization and positioning analysis, 139-144 Child language. See Crib monologues Citizenship // Co-constructions. See Collaborative co-construction Code-switching in illegality narration, 189-190 // 287 // 288 Narrative Analysis // Collaborative co-construction analysis of doctoral interviews and, 162-171 definition, XV and implicit reasons for narratives, 281 interview impacts and, 279-280 positioning analysis and, 151 Coming of age story, 27-28 Communication. See Storytelling Conceptual narrative tools, 184 Conditional knowledge, 45 Confessions, 71 // Conflict. See also Multiple voicing autobiographies and, 124-126 centering self and, 124-125 contesting self and, 123-125 performing self and, 119-121, 123-125 time/conflict in adolescents’ fiction, 27-30 Conformity // Consciousness in crib monologues, 100-102 // Constructionism, 183-184, 278-280 Content analysis in illegality narration, 188-189 Contesting self, 115, 121-125 Counternarration // discovering of, 191-194 extent/function of, 194-197 illegality and, 182-185 unheroic narratives of Holocaust survivors as, 211-215 Creativity. See Imagination Crib monologues // conscious connections and, // 100-102 group analysis and, 88-92 narrative analysis
and, 92-94 narrative sources and, 102-103 sequencing and, 94-97 specificity and, 98-100, 106 stories as sources and, 104 storytelling and, 97-98 Crying. See Embodiments Cultural conventions/tools. See also Native/non-native youth narratives // African American English (AAE) and, 40, 44, 47-51, 52-55 development and, xiv-xvi ethnicity and, 40 heroism and, 207-210. See also Holocaust survivor life histories // illegality narration and, 182-185, // 188-189 Lee, Annie and, 45, 47-48 and legitimizing data via autobiographies, 78 life span developmental roles and, 274 multiple narratives and, 178-179 narratives as material/ conceptual, 184 use of, viii Cultural genres // narration of social development and, 112-115 sociobiographical activities, 115-117, 125 violence prevention programs and, 117-119 Cultural Modeling // African American English (AAE) and, 42, 44-45 design of learning environments via, 58 Cultural scripts, 113 Cultural self // conscious connections and, 100-102 group analysis and, 88-92 narrative analysis and, 92-94 narrative sources and, 102-103 sequencing and, 94-97 specificity and, 98-100, 106 stories as sources and, 104 storytelling and, 97-98 // de Cervantes, Miguel, 6-7 de Maupassant, Guy, 25 Death of Ivan Ilych, The, 73 Declarative knowledge, 45 Degree of embodiment. See Embodiments // Index 289 // Discourse forms/markers adolescents and, xvi-xvii detailed analysis of talk and, 159-160 Holocaust survivor life histories and, 205-206, 214-216 illegality narration
and, 186, // 189-190 narrating as skill and, xvii narrative analysis as, x-xii scripts as, xiv-xv Doctoral education // narrative analysis of interviews and, 162-171 // storytelling dilemmas and, 161-162 Dominant discourses. See Scripts Don Quixote, 6-7 Doppelgänger, 25 Dostoevsky, Fyodor, 25 Dramatic language and AADF, // 47-51 // Dual coding in reading and writing, // 45, 57-58 // Educational inequity and WWII women, 228-233 Embodiments, 14-18 Emotional involvement, 13-14 Empirical analysis. See Positioning analysis // Entity strategies. See Essentialist strategies Essentialist strategies, 255, 258-263 Ethnicity // African American Rhetorical Tradition and, 41 cultural conventions and, 40 illegality narration and, 186, 190 Evaluation // embodiments and, 16 Holocaust survivor life histories and,215-216 illegality narration and, 191, 194-197 narratives of women of the WWII era and, 241 native/non-native youth narratives and, 262-263 // need for narrative flexibility, 274-275 “Story line” analytical tool and, 269 through narrative analysis, xiii Event sequencing, 93-97 Experience Sampling Method (ESM), 66 Expressions. See Embodiments // Facial expressions. See Embodiments Fantasy, 25-26 // Feminist Thought and the Structure of Knowledge, 268 Fiction. See also Imagination // adolescents’ narrative form and, 30-35 // as developmental form, 22 and legitimizing data for narrative analysis, 72-73 social development and, 115 as subjectivity, 127 temporal structure of, 27 time/conflict
in adolescents and, 27-30 Field dependent style, 47-51 Finding the Muse: A Sociopsychological Inquiry Into the Conditions of Artistic Creativity, 57-58, 69 Fortunoff Archives, Yale University, 203 // Galiepter Foundation of Brooklyn, New York, 203 Gender issues. See also Women of the World War II era adolescents’ narrative form and, 28-30, 32 experimental psychology and, 268 facial expressions and, 16 heroism and, 271-273 indexicality in illegality narration and, 190 // Genres // African American English (AAE) and, 40, 44 // 290 Narrative Analysis // cultural self and, 104-105. See also Cultural genres narrative analysis as, x use of film clips, 153 Gestures. See Embodiments Grapes of Wrath, The, 8 Graphic illustrations in illegality narration, 189 “Greatest Generation”. See Women of the World War II era // Heroism, 271-273. See also Holocaust survivor life histories Historical aspects // of experimental psychology, 267-269 linguistics and, 10-11 writing the self and, 23-26 Historical Social Psychology, 268 Hoffmann, E.T.A., 25 Hogg, James, 25 Holocaust survivor life histories counterstories of, 210-211 heroic narratives of, 206-210 impact of, 201-202 survivor syndrome and, 204-206 unheroic narratives of, 211-214 video project background of, 203-204 // Human actions/life experiences. See also Self as developmental form and collection of narrative analysis, 69-70 // and legitimizing data for narrative analysis, 71-74 narrative analysis as, 65-66 Hyperbole and AAE, 44 // Identity
development. See also Self as developmental form discursive psychology and, 160 imagination and, 6-9 Illegality narration/counternarration, 185-191 Imagination // “as if” behavior and, 11-14 believing v., 17-18 Cartesian dualism and, 9-10 // degree of embodiment and, 14-18 development and, xiv etymology of, 9-11 identity development and, 6-9 legitimizing data via // autobiographies and, 78 pregnancy and, 24-25 Imitation and knowledge acquisition, 12 Immigration. See Illegality // narration/counternarration Indexicality in illegality narration, 190 Inequity. See Educational inequity Interviews. See also Women of the World War II era Holocaust survivor life histories and, 204 impact of situation of, 279-280 narrative analysis of interviews and, 162-171 native/non-native youth narratives and, 256-261 // Joint constructions, 279-280 Joy Luck Club, The, 40 // Kafka, Franz, 25 Keller, Helen, 71 Knowledge and internal states of characters, 45 // Language. See also Crib monologues African American Rhetorical Tradition, 41-46 ethnicity and, 40 Holocaust survivor life histories and, 205-206 indexicality in illegality narration, 190 signifying and, 44 Laughing. See Embodiments Lee, Annie, 45, 47-48 Life span development. See also // Holocaust survivor life histories; Human actions/life experiences; Native/non-native youth narratives cultural stories and, 274 // Index 291 // narrative reflexivity and, 275-277 narrative stability and, 277-279 “Story line” analytical tool and, 269 use
of life histories in illegality narration, 186-187 Linear plot stories, 43 Linguistic devices, viii, xvii Literacy development and African // American narrative traditions, 41 Literary fantasy, 25-26 Literature and narrative analysis, 63-66 // Man’s Search for Meaning, 212 Master narratives. See Scripts Material narrative tools, 184 Mayfield Crossing, 117, 128 McDonald Elementary School, 46-47 Mean length of utterance (MLU), 91 Medicine, Mind, and the Double Brain, 25 Memory, 95-97, 105 Mental health // Mental imagery. See Imagination Metaphors, 8-9, viii, x, xii Military. See Women of the World War II era Monologues. See Crib monologues Multiple voicing // development and, xvi-xvii Holocaust survivor life histories and, 202-203 and implicit reasons for narratives, 281 Muting of speech and knowledge acquisition, 12 // Narratives From the Crib, 87, 89 Narrativist strategies, 255, 258-263 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 46, 58 Native/non-native youth narratives folk conceptions of identities and, 247-248 identification of, 249-251 selves/live/life stories as, 251-256 Nausea, 73 // Performance // autobiographies as, 123-124 for different audiences, 127-130 self and, 115, 119-121 Performing self, 124-125, 129-131 Personal persistence interviews, 256-262 Poe, Edgar Allan, 25 Poetics and imagination, 11 Positioning analysis // co-construction of narratives and, 153 narrative analysis of interviews and, 165-166 of Stand By Me, 138-152 storytelling and, 135-137 subthemes
and, 152 Positron emission topography (PET) studies, 17 Poststructuralist theory and illegality narration, 183-184 Postures. See Embodiments Power in society. See Illegality narration/counternarration Procedural knowledge, 45 Proverbs and African American Rhetorical Tradition, 41 // Quixotic Principle and imagination, 7-8 // Racial issues. See also Ethnicity conflict and, 124-126 indexicality in illegality narration and, 190 // Reductionist approaches compared to narrative, viii Referencing in narrating // native/non-native youth narratives and, 253 self/society relations and, xii Reflexivity, 275-277 Regressive narrative, 28 Relational strategies. See Narrativist strategies Research. See also Evaluation Holocaust survivor life histories and, 215-216 // 292 Narrative Analysis // investigative narrative forms, 269-270 native/non-native youth narratives and, 254, 256 performing self and, 129-131 Resiliency and survival, 205 Rewriting the Self, 71-72 Rhetorical justification, 164-165 Richter, Jean Paul, 25 Risk-taking behavior and adolescents, 22-23 // Role-taking and knowledge acquisition, 12 Round Robin letters. See Women of the World War II era // Sarbin, Ted, 268 Sartre, Jean-Paul, 72-73 School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 67-69 Scripts // cultural self and, 102, 113 narratives as defining, xiv-xv transcripts and, 152-157 Self as developmental form. See also Cultural self adolescents’ narrative form and, 30-35 // centering self, 122-123, 155 contesting self, 115, 121-122
historical aspects of, 23-26 and human experiences as narrative criticism, 78-79 legitimizing data via // autobiographies, 71-78 native/non-native youth narratives, 245-248 // performance for different audiences and, 127-130 performing self, 115, 119-121 positioning analysis and, 135-137 self discovery through narratives, 280-281 significance for research and, 129-131 time/conflict in adolescents and, 27-30 // Sermonic tones, 51-52, 55-56 // Sexual harassment and facial expressions, 16 Shrugs. See Embodiments Signifying in African American English, 44 Silent talking. See Muting of speech Social science. See also Cultural self and collection of narrative analysis, 66-71 // constructionism in illegality narration and, 183-184 discursive psychology and, // 159-160, 162 and human experiences as narrative criticism, 78-79 ideological naturalization and, 169-170 illegality narration and, 190-191 interpretation and, 254 investigative narrative forms and, 269-270 and legitimizing data for narrative analysis, 71-74 legitimizing data via // autobiographies, 71-78 life span developmental roles and, 274 poststructuralist theory and, 183-184 // storytelling dilemmas and, 161-162 Sociobiographical activities, // 115-116, 125 Sorrows of Young Werther, The, 7, 17 Speakers. See Storytelling St. Augustine, 71 Stand By Me // positioning analysis (level 1) and, 138-145 positioning analysis (level 2) and, 145-151 // positioning analysis (level 3) and, 151-152 transcripts and, 154-157 Steinbeck, John,
8 Stevenson, Robert Louis, 25-26 “Story line” analytical tool, 269 Story of My Life, The, 71 Storytelling // Index 293 // cultural self and, 97-98, 104 ideological naturalization and, 169-170 positioning analysis and, 135-136 rhetorical justification and, 164-165 as social actions, 159-161 social science doctoral education and, 161-162 Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 7-8 Strange Case of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde, The, 25-26 Subjectivity in fiction, 127 Subthemes, 152 Suicide story, 27, 30-31 Survivor syndrome, 204-206 Syntax // African American English (AAE) and, 40 African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and, 46 // Tan, Amy, 39-40 Temporal structure of stories, 27 Thematic analysis in illegality narration, 187-188 Thesis. See Doctoral education Time/conflict in adolescents’ fiction, 27-30 Toft, Mary, 24-25 Tolstoy, Leo, 73 Tools of narration // (material/conceptual), 184 Topic associative stories, 43 Transcendent narratives. See // Holocaust survivor life histories // Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 7-8, 12, 14, 17 University of Chicago, 67-69 // Values // common sense and, 160 conflict and, 124-126 experimental psychology and, 268 and implicit reasons for narratives, 280-281 through narrative analysis, xiii Video projects of Holocaust survivors, 201-204 Violence prevention programs, // 116-119 // von Goethe, Johann Wolfgang, 7, 25 // War. See Holocaust survivor life histories; Women of the World War II era Werther effect, 7-8 Wilde, Oscar, 25 Women of the World War II era college and,
228-230 identification of, 226-228 impact of, 223-226 military husbands and, 233-236 post-college and, 230-233 post-war and, 236-241 Writing and Cultural Modeling in Narrative Project, 45 // Youth narratives. See Native/ non-native youth narratives // Zone of proximal development (ZPD), 47

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