Úplné zobrazení záznamu

Toto je statický export z katalogu ze dne 19.05.2018. Zobrazit aktuální podobu v katalogu.

Bibliografická citace

.
0 (hodnocen0 x )
(2) Půjčeno:4x 
BK
Second edition
Chichester ; New York ; Weinheim ; Brisbane ; Singapore ; Toronto : John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, [2001]
xxxvii, 417 s. : ilustrace ; 23 cm

objednat
ISBN 0-471-49601-4 (vázáno)
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 349-403 a rejstříky
Popsáno podle dotisku z roku 2002
000078387
Contents // Preface xii // Preface to First Edition xvii // Introduction xix // Chapter Summaries xxvii // Part I Plant Strategies 1 // Chapter 1 Primary Strategies in the Established Phase 3 // Introduction 3 // Classification by architecture 3 // Two- and three-strategy models 4 // The CSR classification 7 // The untenable triangle 8 // Tradeoffs 10 // Competitors 10 // A definition of competition between plants 11 // Competition above and below ground 13 // Characteristics which determine the competitive ability of established plants 14 // Storage organs 14 // Height 14 // Lateral spread 16 // Shoot thrust 18 // Phenology 18 // Leaf longevity 18 // Root longevity 21 // Growth rate 22 // Leaf nutrients 22 // Specific leaf area (SLA) 23 // Rapid growth responses to localised resource depletions (active foraging) 23 // Response to damage 29 // Palatability 30 // Intraspecific variation in competitive ability 30 // Competition in productive and unproductive conditions 35 // VI // CONTENTS // Rejection of the resource-ratio model of competitive ability 37 // An alternative view; the R* model of competition of Tilman 40 // General features of competitors 46 // Phenology and phenotypic plasticity 46 // Life-form and ecology 48 // Stress-tolerators 48 // A definition of stress 48 // Stress in productive and unproductive habitats 48 // Tolerance of severe stress in various types of habitat 49 // Stress-tolerance in arctic and alpine habitats 49 // Stress-tolerance in arid habitats 51
// Stress-tolerance in shaded habitats 52 // Stress-tolerance in nutrient-deficient habitats 55 // Stress-tolerance in urban habitats 63 // General features of stress-tolerance 63 // Stress-tolerance and mineral nutrition: a unifying hypothesis 65 // Stress-tolerance and palatability 71 // Stress-tolerance and decomposition 73 // Stress-tolerance and carbon isotope fractionation 73 // Stress-tolerance and symbiosis 76 // Lichens 76 // Mycorrhizas 76 // Phosphorus scavengers 77 // Nitrogen fixers 78 // Stress-tolerance and facilitation 79 // Ruderals 80 // A definition of disturbance 80 // Vegetation disturbance by climatic fluctuations 81 // Adaptation to frequent and severe disturbance in various types of habitat 82 // Ruderals of the sea-shore 82 // Ruderals of marshland 82 // Arable weeds 83 // Ruderals of trampled ground 84 // Desert annuals 84 // Fire ephemerals 84 // General features of ruderals 85 // Life-cycle 85 // Response to stress 85 // Predictions arising from the CSR model 87 // Three sets of traits 87 // Three types of plant response to stress 88 // Three types of life-history 92 // Tests of the CSR model 94 // CONTENTS vii // Informal tests 94 // Formal tests 95 // Mathematical models 95 // Cellular automaton models 96 // Intraspecific studies 98 // Screening of individual traits 98 // Screening and multivariate analysis of many traits 99 // Vegetation synthesis under controlled conditions 105 // Reconciliation of C-, S-, and R-selection with the theory of r- and
K-selection 110 // Analogous strategies in fungi and in animals 112 // Analogous strategies in economic systems 115 // Chapter 2 Secondary Strategies in the Established Phase 116 // Introduction 116 // Competitive-ruderals 117 // Annual herbs 118 // Biennial herbs 120 // Ruderal-perennial herbs 121 // The general characteristics of competitive-ruderals 122 // Stress-tolerant ruderals 124 // Herbaceous plants 125 // Small annuals and short-lived perennials 125 // Small geophytes 126 // Bryophytes 126 // Stress-tolerant competitors 127 // Herbaceous plants 127 // Woody plants 128 // ‘C-S-R’ strategists 128 // Small tussock grasses 130 // Small, deep-rooted forbs 130 // Small, creeping, or stoloniferous forbs 131 // Strategy and life-form 131 // Triangular ordination; ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ attributes 133 // Intraspecific variation with respect to strategy 136 // Chapter 3 Regenerative Strategies 138 // Introduction 138 // Regeneration by vegetative offspring and by sexually-derived seeds or spores 138 // Types of regenerative strategy 139 // Vegetative expansion (V) 139 // viii CONTENTS // Seasonal regeneration in vegetation gaps (S) 141 // Autumn regeneration 141 // Spring regeneration 143 // General characteristics of seasonal regeneration 146 // Regeneration involving a persistent bank of seeds or spores (Bs) 147 The distribution of persistent seed banks in relation to habitat 149 The mechanism of a persistent bank of buried seeds 151 // Seed burial 151 // Dormancy in
buried seeds 153 // Defences of persistent seeds 155 // Initiation of germination in buried seeds 155 // Dispersal of persistent seeds 159 // Regeneration involving numerous wind-dispersed seeds or spores (W) 159 // Regeneration involving a bank of persistent seedlings (Bsd) 163 // The role of animals in regeneration 165 // Multiple strategies of regeneration 167 // Regeneration failure 172’ // Failure in plants with a single regenerative strategy 172 // Annual and biennial herbs 172 // Trees and shrubs 173 // Failure in plants with more than one regenerative strategy 175 // Regenerative strategies in fungi and in animals 176 // Part II Plant Strategies and Vegetation Processes 177 // Chapter 4 Dominance 179 // Introduction 180 // Dominance in herbaceous vegetation 180 // Dominance by competitive-ruderals 180 // Dominance by competitors 181 // Dominance by stress-tolerant competitors 184 // An index of dominance 184 // Dominant effects of herbaceous perennials upon tree seedlings 187 // Dominant effects of trees upon herbaceous plants 188 // Dominant effects of trees upon other trees and shrubs 192 // Success and failure in dominant plants 194 // Dominance and allelopathy 195 // Co-existence with dominant plants 196 // Analogous phenomena involving animals 197 // CONTENTS // ix // Chapter 5 Assembling of Communities 199 // Introduction 199 // Direct observations in the field 200 // Dominants and subordinates 201 // Transients 204 // The role of subordinates and transients in
communities 205 // Filter effects of subordinates? 206 // Founder effects of transients? 207 // Manipulations of natural communities 208 // Synthesis of communities: I Model assemblages 210 // Recruitment of plant communities from the species pool 211 // Control of relative abundance within communities 211 // Synthesis of communities: II The matrix approach 213 // Chapter 6 Rarification and Extinction 218 // Introduction 218 // Functional shifts and rarification within floras 218 // Functional shifts and rarification within plant communities 220 // Endangered species: an early warning system 223 // Analogous phenomena involving fungi and animals 224 // Chapter 7 Colonisation and Invasion 225 // Introduction 225 // Colonisers and invaders: a comparison 226 // Community invasibility 229 // Chapter 8 Succession 238 // Introduction 238 // Primary succession 239 // Secondary succession in productive environments 241 // Secondary succession in unproductive environments 245 // Models of secondary succession 246 // The role of herbivores in succession 247 // Climax and proclimax 248 // Regenerative strategies and vegetation dynamics 249 // Regenerative strategies in secondary successions 250 // Regenerative strategies in proclimax vegetation 250 // Life forms, strategies, and productivity: a synthesis 251 // Changes in vegetation stability and species richness during secondary successions 254 // x // CONTENTS // Chapter 9 Co-existence 257 // Introduction 257 // Co-existence in herbaceous
vegetation 257 // A model describing the control of species richness in herbaceous vegetation 261 // Quantitative definition of the mechanism controlling species richness in herbaceous vegetation 263 // Co-existence related to spatial variation in environment 267 // Horizontal variation 267 // Vertical stratification 269 // Co-existence related to temporal variation in environment 271 // Seasonal variation 271 // Short-term variation 278 // Long-term variation 278 // Co-existence and mycorrhizas 284 // Co-existence related to genetic variation within populations 286 // Co-existence in woody vegetation 289 // A general model 292 // ‘Reservoir effects’ upon species density 294 // The contribution of epiphytes to species-rich vegetation 297 // Control of species richness by vegetation management 297 // Maintenance of monocultures in agricultural systems 297 // Management of vegetation subject to trampling 298 // Analogous phenomena involving animals 299 // Part III Plant Strategies and Ecosystem Properties 301 // Chapter 10 Trophic Structure, Productivity, and Stability 303 // Introduction 303 // Two examples 305 // The Chernobyl legacy 305 // Nitrogen retention at Cressbrookdale 308 // Implications of the two examples 309 // Effects of plant strategies on trophic structure 311 // Direct observations in the field 312 // Manipulations of ecosystems 316 // Synthesis of ecosystems 319 // Effects of plant strategies on productivity 322 // Field observations and manipulations 323
// Synthesis of ecosystems 326 // CONTENTS // XI // Darwin, diversity and productivity 326 // Experimental design and data interpretation: the current debate 329 // The limitations of synthesised ecosystems 330 // Effects of plant strategies on stability and sustainability 335 // Resistance and resilience 335 // Sustainability 345 // References 349 // Species list 404 // Index 41Q

Zvolte formát: Standardní formát Katalogizační záznam Zkrácený záznam S textovými návěštími S kódy polí MARC