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Bibliografická citace

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(1) Půjčeno:1x 
BK
4th ed.
New York : Columbia University Press, c2002
xx,576 s.

ISBN 0-231-12094-X (váz.)
Obsahuje rejstřík
Bibliografie na s. 483-546
Práce sociální - supervize - pojednání
Supervize - práce sociální - pojednání
000103827
)) Contents // Preface xiii // Acknowledgments xix // 1 History, Definition, and Significance 1 // Historical Development 1 // Development of Education for Social Work 7 // Developing a Literature on Social Work Supervision 11 // Supervision in Group Work and Community Organization 15 // Toward a Definition 18 // The Functions of Supervision 19 // The Objectives of Supervision 20 // The Hierarchical Position of Supervisors 21 // Supervision as an Indirect Service 22 // Supervision as an Interactional Process 22 // Supervision as the Means to an End 22 // Definition of Supervision 23 // Empirical Validation of Definition 23 // Ecology of Social Work Supervision 26 // Community: General and Professional 26 // The Social Work Profession 29 // The Social Work Agency 30 // The Unit Within the Agency 30 // Supervisor-Supervisee Dyad (Supervisee Group) 30 // The Demography of Social Work Supervision 30 // The Significance of Supervision in Social Work 32 // Summary 43 // vi I Contents // 2 Administrative Supervision 45 // Introduction: Organizational Bureaucracy 45 // Tasks 47 // Staff Recruitment and Selection 47 // Inducting and Placing the Worker 48 // Work Planning 51 // Work Assignment 52 // Criteria for Assignment 53 // Work Assignment Procedures 54 // Problems in Work Assignment 55 // Work Delegation 56 // Monitoring, Reviewing, and Evaluating Work 60 // Coordinating Work 62 // The Communication Function 63 // Process in Organizational Communication 64 // Problems in Organizational
Communication 66 // Lateral Communication 68 // Informal Communication 69 // The Supervisor as Advocate 69 // The Supervisor as Administrative Buffer 71 // The Supervisor as Change Agent and Community Liaison 74 // Summary 77 // 3 Administrative Supervision: Problems in Implementation 79 // The Problem of Vicarious Liability 79 // The Problem of Authority and Power 82 // Rationale for Authority and Power 82 // Supervisory Authority and Sources of Power 84 // Reward Power 86 // Coercive Power 87 // Legitimate or Positional Power 87 // Referent Power 88 // Expert Power 89 // Interrelations Between Types of Supervisory Power 89 // Legitimation of Authority 94 // Nonauthoritarian Authority 95 // Problems in the Implementation of Supervisory Authority 98 // Contents I vii // Avoidance and Abrogation of Authority and Power by Supervisors 98 // Organizational Factors Attenuating Supervisory Power and Authority 103 // Supervisee Countervailing Power 106 // The Problem of Rules, Noncompliance, and Disciplinary Action 111 // The Functional Value of Rules 111 // Understanding Noncompliance 116 // Monitoring Noncompliance: Supervisor Responsibility 122 Taking Disciplinary Action 124 // Summary 127 // 4 Educational Supervision: Definition, Differentiation, Content, and Process 129 // Educational Supervision Distinguished from In-Service Training and Staff Development 130 // Significance of Educational Supervision 131 // Relation of Educational Supervision to Administrative Supervision 132
// Content in Educational Supervision 135 // The Individual Conference 143 // Beginning the Conference 143 // Structuring and Scheduling 143 // Preparing 146 // The Middle Phase 148 // Teaching and Learning 148 // Orientations to Teaching and Learning 156 // Providing Helpful Feedback 158 // Ending the Conference 162 // Process Studies 163 // Case Illustration 166 // Summary 174 // 5 Principles and Problems in Implementing Educational Supervision 175 // Conditions for Effective Teaching and Learning: // Introduction 175 // Principle 1: We Learn Best if We Are Highly Motivated to Learn 176 // viii // Contents // Principle 2: We Learn Best When We Can Devote Most of Our Energies to Learning 179 // Principle 3: We Learn Best When Learning Is Successful and Rewarding 183 // Principle 4: We Learn Best if We Are Actively Involved in the Learning Process 186 // Principle 5: We Learn Best if the Content Is Meaningfully Presented 187 // Principle 6: We Learn Best if the Supervisor Takes Into Consideration the Supervisee’s Uniqueness 188 // Establishing a Framework for Educational Supervision 193 // The Significance of the Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship for Educational Supervision 193 // The Supervisor’s Problems in Implementing Educational Supervision 195 // Differentiating Educational Supervision from Therapy 199 // Differences Between Supervision and Therapy 200 // Purpose and Focus 200 // Difference in Role Relationships 202 // Problems in Implementation of Therapy-Educational
Supervision Distinction 204 // Acceptance of Distinction Between Supervision and Therapy: Empirical Data 206 // The Parallel Process Component in Educational Supervision 208 // Developmental Supervision 212 // Summary 216 // 6 Supportive Supervision 217 // Introduction and Overview 217 // Burnout: Definition and Symptoms 224 // Sources of Job-Related Stress for the Supervisee 227 // Administrative Supervision as a Source of Stress 227 // Educational Supervision as a Source of Stress 228 // The Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship as a Source of Stress 229 // The Client as a Source of Stress 231 // The Nature and Context of the Task as a Source of Stress 236 // The Organization as a Source of Tension and Stress 240 // Contents I ix // Community Attitudes Toward Social Work as a Source of Stress 242 // Worker Personality as a Factor in Burnout 244 // Implementing Supportive Supervision 246 // Prevention of Stress 248 // Reducing and Ameliorating Stress 248 // Recapitulation and Some Caveats 258 // The Value of Supportive Supervision: Research Findings 260 Additional Sources of Support for Supervisees 264 // The Client 264 // The Peer Group 264 // Social Support Network 265 // Supervisees’ Adaptations 265 // Supervisees’ Games 266 // Manipulating Demand Levels 266 // Redefining the Relationship 267 // Reducing Power Disparity 269 // Controlling the Situation 271 // Countering Games 274 // Humor in Supervision 276 // Summary 277 // 7 Problems and Stresses in Becoming and Being
a Supervisor 279 // Transition: Worker to Supervisor 280 // Motives for Change 280 // Preparation for Change 281 // Changes in Self-Perception and Identity 283 // From Clinician to Manager 287 // Changes in Peer Relationships 289 // Summary: Stress Associated with Becoming a Supervisor 291 // Ongoing Supervisor Stress: Problems in Being a Supervisor 291 // Ongoing Supervisor Stress: The Challenge of Human Diversity 296 // Race and Ethnicity as Factors in Supervision 297 // White Supervisor-African American Supervisee 297 // African American Supervisor-White Supervisee 299 // Contents // African American Supervisor-African American Supervisee 301 // Gender as a Factor in Transition to Supervision 303 // Gender as a Factor in Ongoing Supervision 305 // Sexual Harassment: A Problem for Supervision 309 // Problems Related to Hierarchical Position 312 // Working with Administrators 313 // Understanding and Working with Administrators 314 // Summary of Stresses Encountered by Supervisors 315 // Coping with Stress: Supervisors’ Adaptations 317 // Supervisors’ Games 320 // The “Good” Supervisor 323 // Summary 327 // 8 Evaluation 329 // Definition 329 // Values of Evaluation 331 // Value to the Worker 331 // Value to the Agency 333 // Value to the Client 334 // Value to the Supervisor 334 // Objectives of Evaluation 335 // Dislike of Evaluations 336 // Desirable Evaluation Procedures 340 // Evaluation Conference: Process 346 // Scheduling the Conference 346 // Supervisor’s Conference
Preparation 346 // Worker’s Conference Preparation 347 // Evaluation Conference Interaction 347 // Communication and Use of Evaluations 350 // Errors in Evaluation 352 // Evaluation Outlines and Rating Forms 355 // Evaluation Content Areas 358 // Sources of Information for Evaluation 372 // Evaluation of Supervisors 375 // Controversial Questions 380 // Summary 387 // Contents I KK // 9 The Group Conference in Supervision 389 // Definition 390 // Advantages of Group Supervision 391 // Disadvantages of Group Supervision 399 // Individual and Group Supervision: Appropriate Use 402 // Research on Group Supervision 403 // Group Supervision: Process 405 // Group Setting 406 // Purpose 406 // Leadership and Planning 407 // Content and Method 410 // Supervisor’s Responsibility in the Group Conference 413 Humor in Group Supervision 419 // Illustration of Group Supervision 420 // Summary 425 // 10 Problems and Innovations 427 // Observation of Performance: The Nature of the Problem 427 Direct Observation of Performance 433 // Sitting In 433 // One-Way Mirrors 433 // Co-therapy Supervision 434 // Observation Via Tapes: Indirect Observation of Performance 435 // Live Supervision During the Interview 442 // Bug-in-the-Ear and Bug-in-the-Eye Supervision 443 // Observing Worker Performance: A Recapitulation 447 // The Problem of Interminable Supervision 448 // Interminable Supervision and Worker Autonomy 449 // Attitudes Toward Interminable Supervision 451 // Innovations for Increasing
Worker Autonomy 454 // Peer Group Supervision 454 // Peer Consultation 455 // Interminable Supervision and Debureaucratization 456 // Supervision in the Managed Care Context 459 // Administrative Supervision and Managed Care 461 // Clinical-Educational Supervision and Managed Care 462 Supportive Supervision and Managed Care 463 // Agency Debureaucratization Experiences 464 // xii I Contents // Problem: The Professional and the Bureaucracy 465 // Ethical Dilemmas in Supervision 469 // Sexism and Social Work Administration 473 // The Problem of Education for Supervision A Perspective: The Positive Values of Professional 475 // Supervision 476 // Summary 480 // Bibliography 483 // Index 547

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