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Bibliografická citace

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BK
2nd ed.
Upper Saddle River : Pearson Education, c2005
x,518 s.,48 s.příl. : il., mapy

objednat
ISBN 0-13-035123-7 (váz.)
Prentice Hall series in geographic information science
Obsahuje ilustrace, fotografie, mapky, předmluvu, dodatky, glosář, rejstřík
Bibliografie: s. 486-508
Kartografie tematická - učebnice vysokošk.
000110844
Preface viii // Chapter 1 Introduction 1 // 1.1 What is a Thematic Map? 2 // 1.2 How are Thematic Maps Used? 3 // 1.3 Basic Steps for Communicating Map Information 3 // 1.4 Consequences of Technological Change in Cartography 6 // 1.5 Geographic Visualization 11 // 1.6 Related Techniques 12 // 1.7 Cognitive Issues in Cartography 14 // 1.8 Social and Ethical Issues in Cartography 15 // 3.3 Methods for Analyzing Spatial Data, // Ignoring Location 34 // 3.4 Numerical Summaries in Which Location Is an Integral Component 47 // -? // Chapter 4 Principles of Symbolization 56 // 4.1 Spatial Arrangement of Geographic Phenomena 57 // 4.2 Levels of Measurement 60 // 4.3 Visual Variables 61 // 4.4 Comparison of Choropleth, Proportional Symbol, Isopleth, and Dot Mapping 64 // 4.5 Selecting Visual Variables for Choropleth Maps 70 // Part I Principles of Cartography // Chapter 2 History of U.S. Academic // Cartography 18 // 2.1 Four Major Periods of U.S. Academic Cartography 18 // 2.2 The Paradigms of American Cartography 30 // Chapter 3 Statistical and Graphical // Foundation 33 // 3.1 Population and Sample 34 // 3.2 Descriptive Versus Inferential Statistics 34 // Chapter 5 Data Classification 74 // 5.1 Common Methods of Data Classification 75 // 5.2 Using Spatial Context to Simplify Choropleth Maps 89 // 5.3 Cluster Analysis 92 // Chapter 6 Scale and Generalization 103 // 6.1 Geographic and Cartographic Scale 103 // 6.2 Definitions of Generalization 104 // 6.3 Models of Generalization 105 //
6.4 The Fundamental Operations of Generalization 110 // 6.5 An Example of Generalization 117 // // Chapter 7 The Earth and Its Coordinate // System 121 // 7.1 Basic Characteristics of the Earth’s Graticule 121 // 7.2 A Brief History of Latitude and Longitude 126 // 7.3 Determining the Earth’s Size and Shape 127 // Chapter 8 Elements of Map Projections 137 // 8.1 The Map Projection Concept 138 // 8.2 The Reference Globe and Developable Surfaces 138 // 8.3 The Mathematics of Map Projections 139 // 8.4 Map Projection Characteristics 142 // 8.5 Distortion on Map Projections 146 // 8.6 Projection Properties 152 // Chapter 9 Selecting an Appropriate Map // Projection 160 // 9.1 Potential Selection Guidelines 161 // 9.2 Examples of Selecting Projections 166 // Chapter 10 Principles of Color 181 // 10.1 How Color Is Processed // by the Human Visual System 181 // 10.2 Hardware Considerations // in Producing Soft-Copy Color Maps 187 // 10.3 Models for Specifying Color 192 // Chapter 11 Elements of Cartographic // Design 199 // 11.1 Alignment and Centering 200 // 11.2 Map Elements 201 // 11.3 Typography 212 // 11.4 Cartographic Design 218 // Chapter 12 Map Reproduction 229 // 12.1 Reproduction Versus Dissemination 230 // 12.2 Planning Ahead 230 // 12.3 Map Editing 231 // 12.4 Raster Image Processing for Print Reproduction 231 // 12.5 Screening for Print Reproduction 232 // 12.6 Aspects of Color Printing 235 // 12.7 Low-Volume Print Reproduction 237 // 12.8 High-Volume Print Reproduction 239 // 12.9 Nonprint Reproduction and Dissemination 245 //
// Part II Mapping Techniques // Chapter 13 Choropleth Mapping 250 // 13.1 Selecting Appropriate Data 250 // 13.2 Data Classification 252 // 13.3 Factors for Selecting a Color Scheme 253 // 13.4 Details of Color Specification 258 // 13.5 Legend Design 262 // 13.6 Classed Versus Unclassed Mapping 265 // Chapter 14 Isarithmic Mapping 271 // 14.1 Selecting Appropriate Data 272 // 14.2 Manual Interpolation 272 // 14.3 Automated Interpolation for True Point Data 273 // 14.4 Criteria for Selecting an Interpolation Method for True Point Data 281 // 14.5 Limitations of Automated Interpolation Approaches 283 // 14.6 Tobler’s Pycnophylactic Approach: An Interpolation Method for Conceptual Point Data 284 // 14.7 Symbolization 286 // Chapter 15 Symbolizing Topography 292 // 15.1 Nature of the Data 292 // 15.2 Vertical Views 293 // 15.3 Oblique Views 305 // 15.4 Physical Models 307 // Chapter 16 Proportional Symbol Mapping 310 // 16.1 Selecting Appropriate Data 311 // 16.2 Kinds of Proportional Symbols 313 // 16.3 Scaling Proportional Symbols 313 // 16.4 Legend Design 321 // 16.5 Handling Symbol Overlap 323 // 16.6 Redundant Symbols 325 // Contents // vii // Chapter 17 Dot and Dasymetric Mapping 328 // 17.1 Selecting Appropriate Data and Ancillary Information 329 // 17.2 Manual Versus Automated Production 329 // 17.3 Creating a Dot Map 329 // 17.4 Eicher and Brewer’s Comparison of Dasymetric Methods 335 // 17.5 Langford and Unwin’s Approach for Mapping Population Density 337 // Chapter 18 Bivariate and Multivariate // Mapping 341 // 18.1 Bivariate Mapping 342 // 18.2 Multivariate Mapping 349 // Chapter 19 Additional Techniques 360 // 19.1 Cartograms 360 // 19.2 Novel Methods for Flow Mapping 364 // 19.3 Mapping True 3-D Phenomena 366 // 19.4 Framed-Rectangle Symbols 369 // 19.5 The Chorodot Map 370 //
Part III Geographic Visualization // Chapter 20 Map Animation 375 // 20.1 Early Developments 375 // 20.2 Visual Variables and Categories of Animation 376 // 20.3 Examples of Animations 378 // 20.4 Does Animation Work? 386 // Chapter 21 Data Exploration 389 // 21.1 Goals of Data Exploration 389 // 21.2 Methods of Data Exploration 390 // 21.3 Examples of Data Exploration Software 392 // Chapter 22 Electronic Atlases and // Multimedia 406 // 22.1 Defining Electronic Atlases 407 // 22.2 Examples of Electronic Atlases 407 // 22.3 Multimedia Systems 416 // Chapter 23 Visualizing Uncertainty 419 // 23.1 Elements of Uncertainty 419 // 23.2 General Methods for Depicting Uncertainty 420 // 23.3 Visual Variables for Depicting Uncertainty 420 // 23.4 Applications of Visualizing Uncertainty 423 // 23.5 Studies of the Effectiveness of Methods for Visualizing Uncertainty 430 // Chapter 24 Virtual and Mixed // Environments 434 // 24.1 Defining Virtual and Mixed Environments 434 // 24.2 Technologies for Creating Virtual Environments 436 // 24.3 The Four “I” Factors of Virtual Environments 437
24.4 Applications of Geospatial Virtual Environments 439 // 24.5 Research Issues in Geospatial Virtual Environments 444 // 24.6 Developments in Mixed Environments 444 // 24.7 Health, Safety, and Social Issues 447 // Chapter 25 Ongoing Developments 450 // 25.1 Carr and His Colleagues’ Work 451 // 25.2 Using Sound to Interpret Spatial Data 453 // 25.3 Collaborative Geo visualization 455 // 25.4 Multimodal Interfaces 457 // 25.5 Information Visualization 459 // 25.6 Spatial Data Mining 461 // 25.7 Keeping Pace with Recent Developments 462 // Appendix A Lengths of One Degree Latitude and Longitude 466 // Appendix B Using the CIE L*u*v* Uniform Color Space to Create Equally / Spaced Colors 469 // Glossary 470 // References 486 // Index 509

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