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Bibliografická citace

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BK
4th ed.
Australia : Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning, c2012
xx, 469 s. : il. ; 28 cm + errata ([2] l.)

ISBN 978-0-8400-3370-3 (brož.)
"International edition"--Obálka
Obsahuje bibliografii na s. 467-468 a rejstřík
000240842
SECTION 1 // Preface xiii // Foundations for Best Practice in Case Management // Chapter 1 Ethics and Other Professional Responsibilities for Human Service Workers 1 // Introduction 1 Language and Ethics 2 Dual Relationships 2 Value Conflicts 6 // The Rights of Individuals Receiving Services 10 Confidentiality 13 // Privacy 17 // I Icalth Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 17 // Social Networking 20 // Privileged Communication 21 // When You Can Give Information 21 // Diagnostic Labeling 24 // Involuntary Commitment 25 // Ethical Responsibilities 26 // Protecting a Person’s Self-Esteem 27 // Stealing from Clients 29 // Competence 30 // Responsibility to Your Colleagues and the Profession 31 // Professional Responsibility 33 // Summary 34 // Talk it Over 34 // Exercises I: Ethics 34 // Exercises II: Ethically, What Went Wrong? 37 Exercises III: Decide on the Best Course of Action 41 // Exercises IV: What is Wrong Here? 42 // Chapter 2 Case Management: Definition and Responsibilities 43 // Introduction 43 // A History of Case Management 44 // Why We Use Case Management 44 // Assessment 45 Planning 46 // Creating an Individualized Plan 49 // Linking 52 // iv Contents // Monitoring 53 // Advocacy 53 // Service Coordination 55 // Levels of Case Management 57 // Separating Case Management from Therapy 59 // Case Management in Provider Agencies 60 // Managed Care and Case Management 61 // Underlying Principles: Hope and Self-Determination 63 // Generic Case Management 65 // Summary 65 // Exercises I: Case Management 66 // Exercises II: Decide on the Best Course of Action 69 // Chapter 3 Applying the Ecological Model: A Theoretical Foundation for Human Services 71 // Introduction 71 // Seeking a Balanced View of the Client 72 // The Three Levels 74 // Looking at What the Person Brings 74 // Looking at What the Context Brings 75 // Developmental Transitions 76 // Developing the Interventions 77 //
Working with the Generalist Approach 78 // Macro Level Interventions are Advocacy 79 // Summary 79 // Exercises I: Looking at Florence’s Problem on Three Levels 80 // Exercises II: Designing Three Levels of Intervention 81 // SECTION 2 // Useful Clarifications and Attitudes // Chapter 4 Cultural Competence 85 // Introduction 85 // Culture and Communication 85 // Your Ethical Responsibility 86 // Where Are the Differences? 86 // Strangers 88 // Anxiety and Uncertainty 89 // Thoughtless versus Thoughtful Communication 90 // Dimensions of Culture 94 // Obstacles to Understanding 99 // Competence 101 // Summary 102 // Exercises I: Testing Your Cultural Competence 103 // Chapter 5 Attitudes and Boundaries 107 // Introduction 107 // Understanding Attitudes 107 Basic Helping Attitudes 108 Reality Check 111 How Clients Are Discouraged 111 Understanding Boundaries 114 // Seeing Yourself and the Client as Completely Separate Individuals 114 Erecting Detrimental Boundaries 116 // Transference and Countertransference 116 Summary 117 // Exercises I: Demonstrating Warmth, Genuineness, and Empathy 118 // Exercises II: Recognizing the Difference — Encouragement or Discouragement 123 // Exercises III: Blurred Boundaries 124 // Chapter 6 Clarifying Who Owns the Problem 127 // Introduction 127 // If the Client Owns the Problem 128 // If You Own the Problem 131 // If You Both Own the Problem 131 // Summary 132 // Exercises I: Who Owns the Problem? 133 Exercises II: Making the Strategic Decision 135 // SECTION З // І Effective Communication // Chapter 7 Identifying Good Responses and Poor Responses // Introduction 137 // Twelve Roadblocks to Communication 138 // Useful Responses 142 // Summary 150 // Exercises: Identifying Roadblocks 150 // Chapter 8 Listening and Responding 153 // Introduction 153 // Defining Reflective Listening 154 // Responding to Feelings 154 // Responding to Content 158 //
Positive Reasons for Reflective Listening 160 // Points to Remember 160 // Summary 162 // Exercises I: How Many Feelings Can You Name? 162 // Exercises II: Finding the Right Feeling 162 // Exercises III: Reflective Listening 163 // Chapter 9 Asking Questions 169 // Introduction 169 // When Questions Are Important 170 // Closed Questions 170 // Open Questions 171 // Questions That Make the Client Feel Uncomfortable 172 // A Formula for Asking Open Questions 173 // Summary 175 // Exercises I: What Is Wrong with These Questions? 176 // Exercises II: Which Question Is Better? 178 // Exercises III: Opening Closed Questions 179 // Exercises IV: Try Asking Questions 181 // Chapter 10 Bringing Up Difficult Issues 183 // Introduction 183 When to Use Confrontation 184 // The І-Message in Confrontation 185 // Asking Permission to Share Ideas 190 // Advocacy: Confronting Collaterals 190 // On Not Becoming Overbearing 191 // Summary 193 // Exercises I: What Is Wrong Here? 193 // Exercises II: Expressing Your Concern 195 // Exercises III: Expressing a Stronger Message 197 // Chapter 11 Addressing and Disarming Anger 199 // Introduction 199 // Common Reasons for Anger 199 // Why Disarming Anger Is Important 200 // Avoiding the Number-One Mistake 201 // Erroneous Expectations for Perfect Communication: Another Reality Check 202 // The Four-Step Process 203 // What You Do Not Want to Do 205 // Look for Useful Information 207 // Managing an Angry Outburst 207 // Summary 208 // Exercises I: Initial Responses to Anger 209 // Exercises II: Practicing Disarming 209 // Chapter 12 The Effective Combination of Skills 211 // Introduction 211 // Combining Skills and Attitudes 212 // Communication Skills That Facilitate Change 213 // Trapping the Client 218 // From Adversarial to Collaborative 219 // Case Manager Traps 221 // Summary 224 // Chapter 13 Putting It All Together: Exercises 227 // Introduction 227 // Exercise I 227 //
Exercise II 228 // Exercise III 231 // Exercise IV 233 // Exercise V 235 // Section 4 Meeting Clients and Assessing Their Strengths and Needs // Chapter 14 Documenting Initial Inquiries 237 // Introduction 237 // Guidelines for Filling Out Forms 238 // Steps for Filling Out the New Referral or Inquiry Form 238 // Evaluating the Client’s Motivation and Mood 240 // Steps for Preparing the Verification of Appointment Form 242 // Summary 243 // Exercises I: Intake of a Middle-Aged Adult 243 // Exercises II: Intake of a Child 244 // Exercises III: Intake of an Infirm, Older Person 244 // Chapter 15 The First Interview 245 // Introduction 245 // Your Role 246 // The Client’s Understanding 246 // Preparing for the First Interview 246 // Your Office 247 // Meeting the Client 248 // Summary 252 // Chapter 16 Social Histories and Assessment Forms 253 // Introduction 253 // What Is a Social History? 254 // Layout of the Social History 254 // How to Ask What You Need to Know 255 // Who Took the Social History 262 // Social Histories in Other Settings 266 // Writing Brief Social Histories 266 // Using an Assessment Form 270 // Taking Social Histories on a Computer 271 // The Next Step 272 // Summary 272 // Exercises I: Practice with Social Histories 273 Exercises II: Assessment of a Middle-Aged Adult 273 // Exercises III: Assessment of a Child 274 Exercises IV: Assessment of an Infirm, Older Person 274 // Exercises V: Creating a File 275 // Chapter 17 Using the DSM 277 // Introduction 277 // Is DSM Only a Mental Health Tool? 278 // Cautions 278 // Who Makes the Diagnosis? 279 // Background Information 279 // Using the DSM 283 // Making the Code 288 // Additional Information 290 // Summary 291 // Exercises: Using the DSM 291 // Chapter 18 The Mental Status Examination 295 // Introduction 295 // Observing the Client 296 Mental Status Examination Outline 297 // Summary 314 // Exercises: Using the MSE Vocabulary 314 //
Chapter 19 Receiving and Releasing Information 317 // Introduction 317 // Sending for Information 317 // If You Release Information 317 // Directions for Using Release Forms 318 // Examples of the Release Forms 320 // When the Client Wants You to Release Information 321 // When the Material Is Received 321 // Summary 322 // Exercises I: Send for Information Related to a Middle-Aged Adult 323 // Exercises II: Send for Information Related to a Child 323 // Exercises III: Send for Information Related to a Frail, Older Person 323 // Exercises IV: Maintaining Your Charts 323 // Chapter 20 Planning for Positive Change and Recovery 325 // Introduction 325 // How People Do Not Change or Recover 326 // What Is Change? 326 // What Is Recovery? 327 // Physical Health Is Part of Wellness 328 // Self-Determination 328 // Relationships that Support Recovery 329 // Collaboration 329 // Encouragement as Part of Recovery 330 Stages of Change 334 // Summary 338 // Exercises: Helping People Change 339 // SECTION 5 // Developing a Plan with the Client // Chapter 21 Developing a Service Plan at the Case Management Unit 341 // Introduction 341 // Involving the Client and the Family 342 // Using the Assessment 343 // Creating the Treatment or Service Plan 346 // How to Identify the Client’s Strengths 347 // Individualized Planning 348 // Understanding Barriers 348 // Sample Goal Plan 349 // Summary 350 // Exercises: Broad Goal Planning 350 // Chapter 22 Preparing for a Service Planning Conference or Disposition Planning Meeting 353 // Introduction 353 // What You Will Need to Bring to the Meeting 354 // Goals for the Meeting 354 // Preparing to Present Your Case 355 // Making the Presentation 356 // Sample Presentation 357 // Collaboration 358 // Follow-Up to Meeting 359 // Summary 359 // Exercises: Planning 360 // Chapter 23 Making the Referral and Assembling the Record 361 // Introduction 361 // Determining Dates 362 //
Sample Referral Notification Form 363 // The Face Sheet 364 // Summary 366 // Exercises: Assembling the Record 367 // Chapter 24 Documentation and Recording 369 // Introduction 369 // Writing Contact Notes 370 // Labeling the Contact 370 // Documenting Service Monitoring 371 // Documentation: Best Practice 372 // Government Requirements 374 // Do Not Be Judgmental 375 // Distinguish Between Facts and Impressions 376 // Give a Balanced Picture of the Person 376 // Provide Evidence of Agreement 376 // Making Changes to the Plan 376 // Summary 377 // Exercises: Recording Your Meeting with the Client 377 // Exercise I: Recording Client Contacts 378 // Exercise II: Using Government Guidelines to Correct Errors 383 // Exercise III: Spotting Recording Errors 384 // SECTION 6 // Monitoring Services and Following the Client // Chapter 25 Monitoring the Services or Treatment 385 // Introduction 385 // What Is Monitoring? 386 // The Financial Purpose of Monitoring 386 // Collaboration with Other Agencies 388 // Advocating 388 // Leave the Office 389 // Responding to a Crisis 390 // Follow-Up 391 // Summary 391 // Chapter 26 Developing Goals and Objectives at the Provider Agency // Introduction 393 // Client Participation/Collaboration 394 Expect Positive Outcomes 394 // Objectives 396 // Combining Goals and Treatment Objectives 397 // Finishing Touches 398 // Summary 401 // Exercises: Developing Goals and Objectives 401 // Chapter 27 Terminating the Case 409 // Introduction 409 // A Successful Termination 410 // The Discharge Summary 412 // Summary 415 // Exercises I: Termination of a Middle-Aged Adult 415 // Exercises II: Termination of a Child 415 // Exercises III: Termination of a Frail, Older Person 415 // Chapter 28 Taking Care of Yourself 417 // Introduction 417 // Failing to See Yourself as an Effective Tool 417 // While Attempting to Understand Others, Failing to Understand Yourself 418 //
Consistently Underestimating Clients and Wearing Yourself Out 419 // Developing Unhealthy Relationships Away from the Agency 422 // Failing to Develop Other Stimulating and Rewarding Interests 423 // Summary 423 // Exercises I: Preserving Your Energy 424 // Exercises II: My Strengths and Weaknesses 424 // Exercises III: Setting Course 425 // Appendix A Ten Fundamental Components of Recovery 427 Appendix В Wildwood Case Management Unit Forms 429 // Appendix С Work Samples 455 // Appendix D Grading the Final Files 463 // References 467 // Index 469

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