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Bibliografická citace

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BK
Second edition
London ; New York : Routledge, 2014
xiv, 178 stran : ilustrace ; 24 cm

objednat
ISBN 978-0-415-83791-0 (brožováno)
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 161-174 a rejstřík
001421031
Contents // List of illustrations ix // Acknowledgements xi // Preface xiii // Chapter 1 What is a translation theory? 1 // 1.1 From theorizing to theories 1 // 1.2 From theories to paradigms 3 // 1.3 How this book is organized 3 // 1.4 Why study translation theories? 4 // 1.5 How should translation theories be studied? 5 // Chapter 2 Natural equivalence 6 // 2.1 Natural equivalence as a concept 7 // 2.2 Equivalence vs. structuralism 9 // 2.3 Procedures for maintaining natural equivalence 11 // 2.4 Text-based equivalence 16 // 2.5 Reference to a tertium comparationis and the “theory of sense" 17 // 2.6 The virtues of natural equivalence 18 // 2.7 Frequently had arguments 19 // 2.8 Natural equivalence as a historical sub-paradigm 20 // Chapter 3 Directional equivalence 24 // 3.1 Two kinds of similarity 26 // 3.2 Directionality in definitions of equivalence 27 // 3.3 Back-translation as a test 29 // 3.4 Polarities of directional equivalence 30 // 3.5 Only two categories? 33 // 3.6 Relevance theory 34 // 3.7 Equivalence as an illusion 37 // 3.8 The virtues of directional equivalence 37 // 3.9 Frequently had arguments 38 // vi CONTENTS // Chapter 4 Purposes 43 // 4.1 Skopos as the key to a new paradigm 44 // 4.2 Reiss, Vermeer, and the origins of the Skopos approach 46 // 4.3 Holz-Mänttäri and the translator’s expertise 49 // 4.4 Purpose-based "good enough" theory 51 // 4.5 Who really decides? 52 // 4.6 The virtues of the purpose paradigm 54 // 4.7 Frequently had arguments 55
// 4.8 An extension into project analysis 58 // Chapter 5 Descriptions 62 // 5.1 What happened to equivalence? 63 // 5.2 Theoretical concepts within the descriptive paradigm 63 // 5.3 Norms 70 // 5.4 “Assumed" translations 73 // 5.5 Target-side priority 74 // 5.6 Universals of translation 75 // 5.7 Laws 78 // 5.8 Process studies 79 // 5.9 Frequently had arguments 80 // 5.1 OThe future of the descriptive paradigm 82 // Chapter 6 Uncertainty 86 // 6.1 Why uncertainty? 86 // 6.2 The uncertainty principle 88 // 6.3 Determinist views of language with indeterminist theories of translation 91 // 6.4 Theories of how to live with uncertainty 96 // 6.5 Deconstruction 105 // 6.6 So how should we translate? 107 // 6.7 Frequently had arguments 109 // Chapter 7 Localization 117 // 7.1 Localization as a paradigm 118 // 7.2 What is localization? 118 // 7.3 What is internationalization? 120 // 7.4 Is localization new? 122 // 7.5 The role of technologies 123 // 7.6 Translation within localization? 131 // 7.7 Frequently had arguments 132 // 7.8 The future of localization 134 // Chapter 8 Cultural translation 138 // 8.1 A new paradigm? 139 // 8.2 Homi Bhabha and “non-substantive” translation 139 // CONTENTS vii // 8.3 Translation without translations: calls for a wider discipline 144 // 8.4 Ethnography as translation 148 // 8.5 Translation sociology 149 // 8.6 Spivak and the psychoanalytics of translation 151 // 8.7 “Generalized translation” 153 // 8.8 Frequently had arguments 154 // Postscript-What if they were all wrong? 159 // References 161 // Index 175

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