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Bibliografická citace

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0 (hodnocen0 x )
BK
Second edition
London ; New York : Routledge, 2007
xxxi, 404 stran ; 22 cm

objednat
ISBN 978-0-582-78409-3 (brožováno)
English languages series
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 369-394, bibliografické odkazy a rejstříky
001421432
Contents // Foreword x // Preface to the second edition xii // Acknowledgements xiv // Publisher’s acknowledgements xv // Introduction 1 // Aim 1 // Language in prose and poetry 2 // Where linguistics comes in 3 // The scope and design of this book 5 // Notes 6 // PART ONE: APPROACHES AND METHODS // 1 Style and choice 9 // 1.1 The domain of style 9 // 1.2 Stylistics 11 // 1.3 Style and content 13 // 1.3.1 Style as the ’dress of thought’: one kind of dualism 13 // 1.3.2 Style as manner of expression: another kind of dualism 16 // 1.3.3 The inseparability of style and content: monism 20 // 1.4 Comparing dualism and monism 22 // 1.5 Pluralism: analysing style in terms of functions 24 // 1.6 A multilevel approach to style 28 // 1.7 Conclusion: meanings of style 31 // Notes 32 // Contents // 2 Style, text and frequency 34 // 2.1 The problem of ’measuring’ style 34 // 2.2 The uses of arithmetic 37 // 2.3 Deviance, prominence and literary relevance 39 // 2.4 Relative norms 41 // 2.5 Primary and secondary norms 44 // 2.6 Internal deviation 44 // 2.7 Pervasive and local characteristics of style 45 // 2.8 Variations in style 46 // 2.9 Features of style 52 // 2.10 Style markers and the principle of selection 55 // 2.11 Conclusion 56 // Notes 57 // 3 A method of analysis and some examples 60 // 3.1 A checklist of linguistic and stylistic categories 61 // 3.2 Notes on the categories 64 // 3.3 Joseph Conrad: example 1 66 // 3.4 D.H. Lawrence: example 2 72 // 3.5 Henry James: example 3 78 // 3.6 Conclusion 88 // 3.7 Quantitative appendix 88 // Notes 94 // 4 Levels of style 95 // 4.1 Language as a cognitive code 95 // 4.2 Messages and models of reality 99 // 4.3 An example: Katherine Mansfield 100 // 4.3.1 The semantic level 101 // 4.3.2 The syntactic level 103 // 4.3.3 The graphological level 104 // 4.3.4 Phonological effects 105 // 4.4 A justification for studying stylistic variants 106 // 4.5 Levels and functions 108 //
4.6 Style and qualitative foregrounding 110 // 4.7 The remainder of this book 116 // Notes 117 // PART TWO: ASPECTS OF STYLE // 5 Language and the fictional world 121 // 5.1 Language, reality and realism 121 // 5.2 Reality and mock reality 123 // 5.3 Specification of detail: symbolism and realism 125 // VI // Contents // 5.4 Real speech and fictional speech 128 // 5.4.1 Realism in conversation 129 // 5.4.2 Dialect and idiolect 134 // 5.4.3 Speech and character 137 // 5.5 The rendering of the fiction 139 // 5.5.1 Fictional point of view 139 // 5.5.2 Fictional sequencing 141 // 5.5.3 Descriptive focus 144 // 5.6 Conclusion 148 // Notes 149 // 6 Mind style 150 // 6.1 Flow linguistic choices affect mind style 152 // 6.2 A comparison of three normal mind styles 154 // 6.3 Some more unusual mind styles 158 // 6.4 A very unusual mind style 162 // 6.4.1 General structure 163 // 6.4.2 Lexis 163 // 6.4.3 Syntax 163 // 6.4.4 Textual relations 165 // Notes 166 // 7 The rhetoric of text 168 // 7.1 The rhetoric of text and discourse 168 // 7.2 The linearity of text 169 // 7.3 The principle of end-focus 170 // 7.4 Segmentation 172 // 7.4.1 The ’rhythm of prose’ 173 // 7.4.2 Segmentation and syntax 175 // 7.5 Simple and complex sentences 176 // 7.5.1 Coordination and subordination 177 // 7.5.2 The principle of climax: ’last is most important’ 179 // 7.5.3 Periodic sentence structure 181 // 7.5.4 Loose sentence structure 183 // 7.6 Addresser-based rhetoric: writing imitating speech 185 // 7.7 konicity: the imitation principle 187 // 7.7.1 Three principles of sequencing 190 // 7.7.2 Juxtaposition 192 // 7.7.3 Other forms of iconicity 195 // 7.8 Cohesion 196 // 7.8.1 Cross-reference 198 // 7.8.2 Linkage 201 // 7.9 Conclusion 204 // Notes 204 // vii // Contents // 8 Discourse and the discourse situation 206 // 8.1 The discourse situation of literature 206 // 8.1.1 Implied author and implied reader 207 //
8.1.2 Authors and narrators 210 // 8.1.3 Narrators and characters 215 // 8.2 Point of view and value language 218 // 8.3 Multiplicity of values 221 // 8.4 Irony 222 // 8.5 Authorial tone 225 // 8.6 Conclusion 229 // Notes 230 // 9 Conversation in the novel 231 // 9.1 Pragmatics and the interpretation of conversation 231 // 9.1.1 Speech acts 233 // 9.1.2 Conversational implica ture 236 // 9.2 Pragmatics and thought 240 // 9.3 ’Conversation’ between authors and readers 242 // 9.4 An extended pragmatic analysis 245 // 9.5 Conversational tone 247 // 9.5.1 An example: references to people 248 // 9.5.2 Other indicators of politeness 250 // 9.5.3 Politeness and formality 252 // 9.6 Conclusion 253 // Notes 254 // 10 Speech and thought presentation 255 // 10.1 The presentation of speech 255 // 10.1.1 Direct and indirect speech (ds and is) 255 // 10.1.2 Free direct speech (fds) 258 // 10.1.3 The narrative report of speech acts (nrsa) 259 // 10.1.4 Free indirect speech (fis) 260 // 10.1.5 The effects and uses of fis 268 // 10.2 The presentation of thought 270 // 10.2.1 The categorisation of thought presentation 270 // 10.2.2 The relationship between inner speech and point of view 273 // 10.2.3 Uses of the categories of thought presentation 274 // 10.3 Conclusion 279 // Notes 281 // 11 Stylistics and fiction 25 years on 282 // 11.1 The development of stylistics as a sub-discipline 282 // Contents // 11.2 New developments in the stylistic analysis of prose fiction and what, with hindsight, we would add to Style in Fiction 289 // 11.2.1 Story/plot 289 // 11.2.2 Fictional worlds, text worlds, mental spaces 294 // 11.2.3 Character and characterisation 296 // 11.3 New developments in the stylistics of prose fiction and what, with hindsight, we would // change in Style in Fiction 298 // 11.3.1 Different kinds of viewpoint and different linguistic indicators of viewpoint 298 // 11.3.2 Narratological aspects of viewpoint 299 //
11.3.3 Speech, thought and writing presentation 302 // 11.4 Detail and precision, and the way ahead 303 // 12 The Bucket and the Rope’ 305 // 12.1 T.F. Powys 306 // 12.2 The Bucket and the Roper 307 // 12.3 Discussion of The Bucket and the Rope’ 313 // 12.3.1 Provisional interpretative comments on the story 313 // 12.3.2 The title of the story: schemata and associations 314 // 12.3.3 The story’s discourse structure: narration, speech presentation and ’framing’ 315 // 12.3.4 The story’s structure 316 // 12.3.5 Structuralist and possible worlds accounts of literary narratives: Claude Brémond and Marie-Laure Ryan 317 // 12.3.6 Linking structure and interpretation: Claude Lévi-Strauss 322 // 12.3.7 Fictional worlds and viewpoint 325 // 12.3.8 Textual analysis in terms of lexis, grammar and meaning 334 // 12.3.9 Characterisation 337 // 12.4 Assessing the new techniques 341 // Notes 342 // Passages and topics for further study 344 // Further reading 369 // Bibliography 381 // Index of works discussed 395 // General index 397 // ix // Index of works discussed // Amis, Kingsley, Lucky Jim, 133 // Austen, Jane, Emma, 219-20, 248 Mansfield Park, 134-5, 208 Persuasion, 261-2, 272 Pride and Prejudice, 233-6, 243, 253 Sense and Sensibility, 219-20 // Beckett, Samuel, Watt, 202-4 // Bennett, Arnold, Cluyhanger, 140-1 // Bronte, Emily, Wuthering Heights, 135, 210-11, 238 // BUNYAN, John, A Pilgrim’s Progress, // 201 // Burgess, Anthony, A Clockwork Orange, 213 // Butler, samuel. The Way of All Flesh, 107-8, 223 // Christie, Agatha. Destination Unknown, 237-8 // Conrad, Joseph, Nostromo, 207, 216, 280-1 // The Secret Agent, 176-7, 190-1, 199-200, 265, 269 The Secret Sharer, 66-72 // Dickens, Charles, Burnaby Rudge, // 182-3 // Bleak House, 51-2, 105, 110, 135-6, 214, 259, 263-4 // David Copperfield, 134, 211-12, 221, 271-2 // Dombey and Son, 46-50, 105, 173-4, 249-53 // Hard Times, 135, 138-9 //
Our Mutual Friend, 105-6, 137 // Pickwick Papers, 135 // Dos Passos, John, Manhattan Transfer, 192, 193-4 // Eliot, George, Daniel Deronda, 226-9 Middlemarch, 213, 214-15, 226 // Faulkner, William. The Bear, 18,160-1 The Sound and the Fury, 162-6, 222 // Fielding, Henry, Tom Jones, 225, 269 // Forster, E.M., Celestial Omnibus, 231-2 A Passage to India, 197-200, 202 // FOWLES, John, The Magus, 232-3 // Gibbon, Edward, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 180-1 // Golding, William The Inheritors, 25-9 // Greene, Graham, Brighton Rock, 184 // Hardy, Thomas. The Return of the Native, 159-60 // Tess of the D’Urbervilles, 135, 274 // Heller, Joseph, Catch 22, 178-9 // Hemingway, Ernest, A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, 258 // The Old Man and the Sea, 45, 278-9 The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, 140,143-4, 146-7 // Huxley, ALDOUS, Point Counter Point, 122-3 // ISHERWOOD, Christopher, A Single Man, 152-3 // Style in Fiction // James, Henry, The Ambassadors, 183 The Birthplace, 156-9 The Pupil, 78-88 // Joyce, James, The Dead, 142, 260, 274-5 Eveline, 277 Finnegans Wake, 111 A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 23, 147, 208 Two Gallants, 155-6 Ulysses, 150-2, 202, 230, 241-2, 259, 275, 279 // KESEY, Ken. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 244-7 // Lawrence, D.H., The Horse Dealer’s Daughter, 131-2, 279-80 Odour of Chrysanthemums, 37, 72-7,126 Studies in Classic American Literature, // 174-5, 180, 186 Women in Love, 185 You Touched Me, 273-4 // Le Carré, John, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, 238-9 // Lowry, Malcolm, Under the Volcano, // 177, 275 // LYLY, JOHN, Euphues, 14-15 // Mailer, Norman. The Armies of the Night, 187 // MANSFIELD, KATHERINE, A Cup of Tea, 100-5 // Maugham, Somerset. Cakes and Ale, 224-5 // Murdoch, Iris, An Unofficial Rose, 276 // Nabokov, Vladimir, Lolita, 209, 212-13, 264 // Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four, 150-2 // Parker, Dorothy. Here We Are, 243-4 // Peake, MERVYN, Gormenghast, 24, 111-16 //
PEPYS, Samuel. Diary, 185 // Powys, John Cowper, A Glastonbury Romance, 161-2 // Powys, Theodore Francis, The Bucket and the Rope, 306-42 // Richardson, Samuel, Clarissa, 217-18 // Scott, Paul, Staying On, 264-5 // SILLITOE, Alan, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, 239-40 // Smollett, Tobias, The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, 137 // Humphry Clinker, 223 // Roderick Random, 191 // Steinbeck, John, The Grapes of Wrath, 154-5 // Of Mice and Men, 153, 178, 292-3 // Sterne, Laurence, Tristram Shandy, 195-6, 209, 225 // Swift, Jonathan, Gulliver’s Travels, 127-8, 146, 266-7 // Wilson, Angus. Raspberry Jam, 278 // Woolf, Virginia, Mrs Dalloway, 240-1, 267-8, 273, 275 // 396

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