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Bibliografická citace

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0 (hodnocen0 x )
BK
First published
Chichester : Wiley Blackwell, 2014
xi, 318 stran : ilustrace ; 26 cm

objednat
ISBN 978-1-118-41483-5 (vázáno)
Obsahuje bibliografii na stranách 255-309 a rejstřík
001462017
Acknowledgements ix // About the Companion Website xi // Chapter 1 Introduction 1 // 1.1 Connectivity and inequality 1 // 1.2 Six degrees of connection 3 // 1.3 Rivers as integrators 6 // 1.4 Organization of this volume 7 // 1.5 Understanding rivers 9 // 1.5.1 The Colorado Front Range 9 // 1.6 Only connect 19 // Chapter 2 Creating channels and channel networks 21 // 2.1 Generating water, solutes, and sediment 21 // 2.1.1 Generating water 21 // 2.1.2 Generating sediment and solutes 22 // 2.2 Getting water, solutes, and sediment downslope to channels 23 // 2.2.1 Downslope pathways of water 23 // 2.2.2 Downslope movement of sediment 29 // 2.2.3 Processes and patterns of water chemistry entering channels 32 // 2.2.4 Influence of the riparian zone on fluxes into channels 32 // 2.3 Channel initiation 34 // 2.4 Extension and development of the drainage network 37 // 2.4.1 Morphometric indices and scaling laws 37 // 2.4.2 Optimality 40 // 2.5 Spatial differentiation within drainage basins 41 // 2.6 Summary 43 // Channel processes I 45 // Chapter 3 Water dynamics 47 // 3.1 Hydraulics 47 // 3.1.1 Flow classification 48 // 3.1.2 Energy, flow state, and hydraulic jumps 51 // 3.1.3 Uniform flow equations and flow resistance 53 // 3.1.4 Velocity and turbulence 60 // 3.1.5 Measures of energy exerted against the channel boundaries 65 // Contents // vi // 3.2 Hydrology 67 // 3.2.1 Measuring, indirectly estimating, and modeling discharge 67 // 3.2.2 Flood frequency analysis 71 // 3.2.3 Hydrographs 73 // 3.2.4 Other parameters used to characterize discharge 75 // 3.2.5 Hyporheic exchange and hydrology 77 // 3.2.6 River hydrology in cold regions 77 // 3.2.7 Human influences on hydrology 78 // 3.3 Summary 79 // Channel processes II 81 // Chapter 4 Fluvial sediment dynamics 83 // 4.1 The channel bed and initiation of motion 84 // 4.1.1 Bed sediment characterization 84 // 4.1.2 Entrainment of non-cohesive sediment 85 //
4.1.3 Erosion of cohesive beds 89 // 4.2 Sediment transport 91 // 4.2.1 Dissolved load 91 // 4.2.2 Suspended load 94 // 4.2.3 Bed load 98 // 4.3 Bedforms 104 // 4.3.1 Readily mobile bedforms 105 // 4.3.2 Infrequently mobile bedforms 108 // 4.3.3 Bedforms in cohesive sediments 115 // 4.4 In-channel depositional processes 115 // 4.5 Bank stability and erosion 117 // 4.6 Sediment budgets 120 // 4.7 Summary 124 // Chapter 5 Channel forms 125 // 5.1 Cross-sectional geometry 125 // 5.1.1 Bankfull, dominant, and effective discharge 125 // 5.1.2 Width to depth ratio 127 5.1.3 Hydraulic geometry 128 // 5.1.4 Lanes balance 130 // 5.1.5 Complex response 132 // 5.1.6 Channel evolution models 133 // 5.2 Channel planform 133 // 5.2.1 Straight channels 135 // 5.2.2 Meandering channels 136 // 5.2.3 Wandering channels 139 // 5.2.4 Braided channels 139 // 5.2.5 Anabranching channels 142 // Contents // vii // 5.2.6 Compound channels 143 // 5.2.7 Karst channels 144 // 5.2.8 Continuum concept 144 // 5.2.9 River metamorphosis 146 // 5.3 Confluences 147 // 5.4 River gradient 149 // 5.4.1 Longitudinal profile 151 // 5.4.2 Stream gradient index 153 // 5.4.3 Knickpoints 154 // 5.5 Adjustment of channel form 156 // 5.5.1 Extremal hypotheses of channel adjustment 157 // 5.5.2 Geomorphic effects of floods 157 // 5.6 Downstream trends 160 // 5.6.1 Grain size 160 // 5.6.2 Instream wood 161 // 5.7 Summary 163 // Chapter 6 Extra-channel environments 165 // 6.1 Floodplains 165 // 6.1.1 Depositional processes and floodplain stratigraphy 167 // 6.1.2 Erosional processes and floodplain turnover times 172 // 6.1.3 Downstream trends in floodplain form and process 174 // 6.1.4 Classification of floodplains 175 // 6.2 Terraces 175 // 6.2.1 Terrace classifications 176 // 6.2.2 Mechanisms of terrace formation and preservation 176 // 6.2.3 Terraces as paleoproflles and paleoenvironmental indicators 179 // 6.3 Alluvial Fans 181 //
6.3.1 Erosional and depositional processes 182 // 6.3.2 Fan geometry and stratigraphy 183 // 6.4 Deltas 185 // 6.4.1 Processes of erosion and deposition 186 // 6.4.2 Delta morphology and stratigraphy 187 // 6.4.3 Paleoenvironmental records 190 // 6.4.4 Deltas in the Anthropocene 191 // 6.5 Estuaries 192 // 6.6 Summary 194 // Chapter 7 Humans and rivers 197 // 7.1 Indirect impacts 198 // 7.1.1 Climate change 198 // 7.1.2 Altered land cover 200 // 7.2 Direct impacts 205 // 7.2.1 Flow regulation 205 // 7.2.2 Altered channel form and connectivity 208 // Contents // vii) // 7.3 River management in an environmental context 215 // 7.3.1 Reference conditions 215 // 7.3.2 Restoration 217 // 7.3.3 Instream, channel maintenance, and environmental flows 221 // 7.4 River health 223 // 7.5 Summary 224 // Chapter 8 Rivers in the landscape 225 // 8.1 Rivers and topography 225 // 8.1.1 Tectonic influences on river geometry 226 // 8.1.2 Effects of river incision on tectonics 228 // 8.1.3 Indicators of relations between rivers and landscape evolution 228 // 8.1.4 Tectonics, topography, and large rivers 229 // 8.2 Geomorphic process domains 230 // 8.3 Connectivity 232 // 8.4 Climatic signatures 234 // 8.4.1 High latitudes 234 // 8.4.2 Low latitudes 235 // 8.4.3 Warm drylands 236 // 8.5 Rivers with a history 237 // 8.5.1 Upper South Platte River drainage, Colorado, USA 240 // 8.5.2 Upper Rio Chagres, Panama 242 // 8.5.3 Mackenzie River drainage, Canada 244 // 8.5.4 Oregon Coast Range, USA 246 // 8.5.5 Yuma Wash, Arizona, USA 248 // 8.6 The greater context 250 // References // Index // 255 // 311

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