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Bibliografická citace

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First edition.
Singapore : Pan Stanford Publishing, [2017]
1 online zdroj (xv, \1 s.ges)
Externí odkaz    Plný text PDF 
   * Návod pro vzdálený přístup 


ISBN 9781315229324 (e-book : PDF)
ISBN 9781351858731 (e-book: Mobi)
ISBN !9789814774086 (chyb.) (hardback)
Tištěná verze : ISBN 9789814774086
chapter Introduction / Choon Ho Do -- part Part I Chemistry Inherited from theUniverse -- chapter 1 Chemistry in the Universe, Our Body, and Our Life -- chapter 2 Chemistry in Human History -- chapter 3 Did Chemistry Change the World? -- part Part II Contributions of Chemistry -- chapter 4 Agriculture / Livia Simon Sarkadi -- chapter 5 Food: Supply and Health -- chapter 6 Energy / James Wei -- chapter 7 Medication: Diagnosis -- chapter 8 Medication: Curing -- chapter 9 Regenerative Medicine: Repairing Body -- chapter 10 Transportation / James Wei -- chapter 11 Communication and Entertainment / Attila E. Pavlath -- part Part III Chemistry and Activities -- chapter 12 Problems and Solutions: Activities of Chemists and Educators for the Public -- chapter 13 What Can Chemistry Do for the Future? -- chapter 14 Chemistry in Africa: Progress and Application.
"This book discusses the vital role of chemistry in everyday life. It encourages readers to understand how the knowledge of chemistry is important for the development of society and a better future. The text is organized into three parts. Part I covers the historical aspects of chemistry and discusses how countless discoveries since the beginning of life on earth have benefited human beings. Part II focuses on modern life and describes chemistry’s contribution to the developments in the fields of food and agriculture, energy, transportation, medicine, and communications. Part III emphasizes the role of chemists and educators in making the layperson aware of the benefits of chemistry without having them to go through its complexities. Written in an easy-to-understand manner and supplemented by ample number of figures and tables, the book will cater to a broad readership ranging from general readers to experts."--Provided by publisher..
001478188
Contents // Preface xiii // Introduction 1 // Choon Ho Do and Attila E. Paviath // Part I: Chemistry Inherited from the Universe // 1. Chemistry in the Universe, Our Body, and Our Life 9 // Sunney I. Chan and Andrew P. Yeh // 1.1 The Very Beginning of the Universe 9 // 1.2 Alchemy and Alchemist 10 // 1.3 The Very Beginning of the Beginning of Modern // Chemistry 12 // 1.4 Dalton’s Atomic Theory: Emergence of Modern // Chemistry 13 // 1.5 Periodic Table of Elements 15 // 1.6 Quantum Chemistry and the Nature of the // Chemical Bond 15 // 1.7 The Emergence of Life 16 // 1.8 Modern Biology Is All Chemistry 19 // 1.9 Molecular Building Blocks of a Cell 24 // 1.10 Central Dogma of Molecular Biology 25 // 1.11 Applications of Molecular Biology 28 // 1.12 Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics 30 // 1.13 Enzymes as Perfect Catalysts 31 // 1.14 Can We Learn from Biology to Develop More // Efficient Chemical Catalysts for Chemical Manufacturing? 32 // 1.15 Greener Chemistry 34 // 1.16 Future of Chemistry 34 // 2. Chemistry in Human History 39 // Mary Virginia Orna // 2.1 The Value of History 39 // 2.1.1 Valuing the Past 39 // 2.1.2 Purpose of Human Activity 40 // 2.1.3 Building on Precedent 40 // vi Contents // 2.1.4 Materials on Hand 40 // 2.1.5 Origins of Material Culture 41 // 2.2 Uses of Natural Substances 41 // 2.2.1 Introductory Remarks 41 // 2.2.2 Observation Results in Application 41 // 2.2.3 Improving on Nature through Knowledge 42 // 2.3 The Basics of Survival 42 // 2.3.1 Inventiveness 42
// 2.3.2 Control of the Environment 43 // 2.3.3 How Gunpowder Changed the World 43 // 2.4 Control of the Necessities of Life: Food 46 // 2.4.1 In the Beginning 46 // 2.4.2 Agriculture 47 // 2.4.3 Salt 48 // 2.5 Control of the Necessities of Life: Clothing 49 // 2.5.1 Introduction 49 // 2.5.2 Nature of Polymers 50 // 2.5.3 Coloring Fibers 50 // 2.5.4 Emergence of the Dye Industry 51 // 2.6 Control of the Necessities of Life: Shelter 55 // 2.6.1 Introduction 55 // 2.6.2 Clay Stone, and Wood 55 // 2.6.3 Metals 57 // 2.6.4 Glass 58 // 2.7 Communication 60 // 2.8 Measurement 63 // 2.8.1 Introduction 63 // 2.8.2 Quantitative Experimentation 64 // 2.8.3 Conservation of Mass 64 // 2.9 Chemistry’s Role in the Development of // Medicine 65 // 2.9.1 From the Medical School in Salerno // to Universities 65 // 2.9.2 The Body in Movement 65 // 2.9.3 Healing the Body Healing the Soul: // Hospitals 66 // 2.9.4 Anesthetics and Antiseptics 66 // 2.9.5 Laboratory 67 // Contents vii // 2.9.6 Pharmacology 67 // 2.10 Conclusion 69 // 3. Did Chemistry Change the World? 73 // Attila E. Pavlath // 3.1 Introduction 73 // 3.2 Construction Materials 75 // 3.2.1 Wood 75 // 3.2.2 Metals 76 // 3.2.3 Plastic 80 // 3.2.4 Leather and Textile 81 // 3.2.5 From Pottery to Glass through Ceramic 82 // 3.3 Conclusion 84 // Part II: Contributions of Chemistry // 4. Agriculture 87 // Livia Simon Sarkadi // 4.1 Introduction 87 // 4.2 Development of Agriculture 88 // 4.2.1 Brief Chronology of
Main Achievements 89 // 4.3 Chemical Fertilizers and Soil Nutrients 96 // 4.4 Crop Protection and Pest Management 98 // 4.5 Livestock Production and Protection 103 // 4.5.1 Brief History of Livestock Production 104 // 4.5.2 Veterinary Medical Care 105 // 4.6 New Challenges for Agriculture 107 // 4.7 Closing Words 110 // 5. Food: Supply and Health 113 // Livia Simon Sarkadi // 5.1 Introduction 113 // 5.2 Brief History of Food Chemistry and Nutrition 114 // 5.3 Food Availability 119 // 5.4 Food and Health 120 // 5.4.1 Food and Its Classification 120 // 5.5 Food Preservation 127 // 5.6 Food Additives and Ingredients 133 // 5.7 Food Packaging 137 // 5.8 Closing Words 139 // Contents // Energy James Wei 141 // ?? Fossil Fuel: Fire and Combustion 142 // 6.1.1 Fuel Mining, Refining 142 // 6.1.2 Combustion Process 148 // 6.1.3 Safety, Health, and Environment 150 // 6.2 Biofuel 154 // 6.2.1 Biochemical Fermentation of Food 154 // 6.2.2 Biochemical Fermentation of Biomass 156 // 6.2.3 Thermochemical Reactions of Biomass 157 // 6.3 Batteries 158 // 6.4 Nuclear Power 160 // 6.4.1 Mining and Fuel Enrichment 160 // 6.4.2 Nuclear Reactor Process 164 // 6.4.3 Safety, Health, and Environment 166 // Medication: Diagnosis 169 // Veronica Németh // 7.1 Introduction 169 // 7.2 Diagnostic in Clinical Laboratory 170 // 7.2.1 Historical Perspective 170 // 7.2.2 We Prefer Testing to Tasting 172 // 7.2.3 Enzymes in Blood Serum: Enzyme Diagnostics 173 // 7.2.4 Laboratory Diagnosis of Myocardial
Infarction 174 // 7.2.5 Application of Dry Chemistry in Clinical Chemistry 175 // 7.2.6 The Strip Technique 176 // 7.3 The Inside of Our Body Becomes Transparent 178 // 7.3.1 X-Rays Triumph 178 // 7.3.2 Petites Curies 181 // 7.3.3 X-Ray Detection 182 // 7.3.4 Further Development of X-Ray Technology 184 // 7.3.5 CT Scan 184 // 7.3.6 Development of CT Apparatus 186 // 7.3.7 Isotopes in Diagnostics 188 // Contents ix // 7.3.8 Scintigraphic Procedures 189 // 7.3.9 Positron Emission Tomography 191 // 7.3.10 Diagnosis in a Magnetic Field 194 // 7.3.11 Contrast Materials 195 // 7.4 A Small Detour: Crystal Structure Determination 197 // 8. Medication: Curing 203 // Erika Godor and Dorottya Godor // 8.1 Introduction 203 // 8.1.1 Examples of the Impact of Chemistry on Medicine—in Raw Numbers and // in Social Terms 204 // 8.1.2 Chapter Aim 205 // 8.1.3 Versatility of Medicinal Chemistry 206 // 8.1.4 Current Trends in Drug Development 207 // 8.1.5 Drug Safety: A Lesson from the Past 208 // 8.1.6 Where Next? 208 // 8.2 Pain Management 208 // 8.2.1 Aspirin 209 // 8.2.2 Morphine 213 // 8.3 Inflammation Management 229 // 8.3.1 Glucocorticoids 229 // 8.3.2 The Steroid Story 236 // 8.3.3 Closing Remarks 238 // 8.4 Psychotherapeutic Agents 239 // 8.4.1 Antidepressants 240 // 8.4.2 Closing Remarks 247 // 8.5 Hormonal Contraceptives 248 // 8.5.1 Pearls on the Pill 248 // 8.5.2 Prelude to the Pill 249 // 8.5.3 Conceiving the Pill 251 // 8.5.4 Closing Remarks: The Power of the Pill 259
8.6 Insulin 259 // 8.6.1 Insulin and Diabetes 260 // 8.6.2 Life with Diabetes in the Past 262 // 8.6.3 Prelude to the Discovery of Insulin 263 // 8.6.4 Discovery of Insulin 264 // Contents // 8.6.5 Making the Experiments Work 266 // 8.6.6 Getting the Elixir Right 267 // 8.6.7 First Diabetes Patients on Insulin 268 // 8.6.8 Getting the Nobel Prize: Resentments Resolved 269 // 8.6.9 Romantic Stories behind the Mass Production of Insulin 269 // 8.6.10 Lab-Grown Human Insulin 273 // 8.6.11 Closing Remarks: The Impact of Insulin 273 // 9. Regenerative Medicine: Repairing Body 281 // Young Ha Kim // 9.1 Artificial Organs 283 // 9.1.1 Artificial Kidney 283 // 9.1.2 Artificial Heart 285 // 9.1.3 Artificial Eye Lens 289 // 9.1.4 Limitations of Present Artificial Organs 292 // 9.2 Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering 294 // 9.2.1 Cell Therapy 294 // 9.2.2 Biohybrid Organs 297 // 9.2.3 Tissue Engineering 300 // 10. Transportation 305 // James Wei // 10.1 Vehicles: Frame, Wheel, Ship Planks 307 // 10.1.1 Frame Material 307 // 10.1.2 Wheel and Rubber Tire 311 // 10.1.3 Ship Caulking and Tar 313 // 10.2 Power, Fuel, Engine 315 // 10.2.1 Fuel 316 // 10.2.2 Engine, Lubricant 322 // 10.3 Navigation: Compass 324 // 10.4 Infrastructure: Roads 327 // 10.4.1 Tar and Asphalt 328 // 10.4.2 Concrete 329 // 11. Communication and Entertainment 331 // Attila E. Pavlath 11.1 Introduction // 331 // Contents xi // 11.2 Process of Communication 332 // 11.2.1 Advanced Synthetic
Materials 333 // 11.2.2 Communication Devices 333 // 11.2.3 Storing Information 347 // 11.3 Entertainment 358 // 11.3.1 Computers 360 // 11.4 Closing Word 362 // Part III: Chemistry and Activities // 12. Problems and Solutions: Activities of Chemists and // Educators for the Public 367 // Attila E. Pavlath // 12.1 Public Image of Chemistry 367 // 12.2 Chemistry Has an Undeserved Public Image 367 // 12.3 Is It Important to Improve the Public Image // of Chemistry? Does It Make Any Difference? 370 // 12.4 What Is Needed? 371 // 12.5 Science Education 372 // 12.6 Creation of Interest toward Science 372 // 12.7 Role of Individual Chemist and Chemical Societies 375 // 13. What Can Chemistry Do for the Future? 381 // Choon Ho Do // 13.1 Introduction 381 // 13.2 The Future May Come Differently 385 // 13.3 Future Issues 386 // 13.3.1 Artificial Photosynthesis 387 // 13.3.2 New Energy Sources: Generation and Saving 390 // 13.3.3 Materials 399 // 13.3.4 Climate Control 402 // 13.3.5 Human Life and Health 405 // 13.3.6 Humans and Nature 408 // 13.3.7 Changes in the Desert 410 // 13.3.8 Use of Oceans and Seas 412 // 13.3.9 Space Travel: A Never-Ending Quest 416 // 13.4 Prospects: All Is a Matter of Chemistry and Us 421 // xii Contents // 14. Chemistry in Africa: Progress and Application 427 // Temechegn Engida // 14.1 Introduction 427 // 14.2 Traditional Medicine, Indigenous Practices, // and Chemistry in Africa 428 // 14.3 Chemistry Research in Africa 434 // 14.4 Chemistry for Sustainable
Development in Africa 439 // Index 447
(OCoLC)993986087

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