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EB
EB
ONLINE
Third edition
Indianapolis, IN : John Wiley & Sons, [2015]
1 online zdroj (1 volume) : ilustrace
Externí odkaz    Plný text PDF 
   * Návod pro vzdálený přístup 


ISBN 9781119209409 (elektronická kniha)
ISBN 1119209404 (elektronická kniha)
ISBN !9781118983843 (chyb.)
ISBN 9781118983850
ISBN 1118983858
ISBN 111898384X
ISBN 9781118983843
Tištěné vydání Blum, Richard, 1962- Linux command line and shell scripting bible. Third edition. Indianapolis, IN : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., [2015] ISBN 111898384X
Includes index
Frontmatter -- Part I: The Linux Command Line. Starting with Linux Shells -- Getting to the Shell -- Basic bash Shell Commands -- More bash Shell Commands -- Understanding the Shell -- Using Linux Environment Variables -- Understanding Linux File Permissions -- Managing Filesystems -- Installing Software -- Working with Editors -- Part II: Shell Scripting Basics. Basic Script Building -- Using Structured Commands -- More Structured Commands -- Handling User Input -- Presenting Data -- Script Control -- Part III: Advanced Shell Scripting. Creating Functions -- Writing Scripts for Graphical Desktops -- Introducing sed and gawk -- Regular Expressions -- Advanced sed -- Advanced gawk -- Working with Alternative Shells -- Part IV: Creating Practical Scripts. Writing Simple Script Utilities -- Producing Scripts for Database, Web, and E-Mail -- Creating Fun Little Shell Scripts -- Appendix A: Quick Guide to bash Commands -- Appendix B: Quick Guide to sed and gawk
Description based on print version record
001479493
Contents at a Glance // Introduction...xxxi // Part I The Linux Command Line...1 // Chapter 1 Starting with Linux Shells...3 // Chapter 2 Getting to the Shell...23 // Chapter 3 Basic bash Shell Commands...47 // Chapter 4 More bash Shell Commands...85 // Chapter 5 Understanding the Shell...113 // Chapter 6 Using Linux Environment Variables...135 // Chapter 7 Understanding Linux File Permissions...161 // Chapter 8 Managing Filesystems...187 // Chapter 9 Installing Software...211 // Chapter 10 Working with Editors...233 // Part II Shell Scripting Basics...267 // Chapter 11 Basic Script Building...269 // Chapter 12 Using Structured Commands...297 // Chapter 13 More Structured Commands...331 // Chapter 14 Handling User Input...365 // Chapter 15 Presenting Data...395 // Chapter 16 Script Control...419 // Part III Advanced Shell Scripting...447 // Chapter 17 Creating Functions...449 // Chapter 18 Writing Scripts for Graphical Desktops...477 // Chapter 19 Introducing sed and gawk...505 // Chapter 20 Regular Expressions...535 // Chapter 21 Advanced sed...561 // Chapter 22 Advanced gawk...591 // Chapter 23 Working with Alternative Shells...623 // Contents at a Glance // Part IV Creating Practical Scripts... // Chapter 24 Writing Simple Script Utilities... // Chapter 25 Producing Scripts for Database, Web, and E-Mail Chapter 26 Creating Fun Little Shell Scripts... // 643 // ..645 // ..681 // ..709 // Appendix A: Quick Guide to bash Commands Appendix B: Quick Guide to sed and gawk ... Index...
// 739 // 751 // 763 // XIV // Contents // ’?, // Introduction... // Part I: The Linux Command Line 1 // Chapter 1: Starting with Linux Shells...3 // What Is Linux?... // Looking into the Linux kernel...4 // System memory management...5 // Software program management...6 // Hardware management...7 // Filesystem management...8 // The GNU utilities...9 // The core GNU utilities...9 // The shell... // The Linux desktop environment...11 // The X Window system...? // The KDE desktop...12 // The GNOME desktop...13 // The Unity desktop... // Other desktops... // Linux Distributions... // Core Linux distributions... // Specialized Linux distributions...18 // The Linux LiveCD... // Summary...21 // Chapter 2: Getting to the Shell...23 // Reaching the Command Line...23 // Console terminals...24 // Graphical terminals...24 // Accessing CLI via a Linux Console Terminal...25 // Accessing CLI via Graphical Terminal Emulation...28 // XV // Contents // Using the GNOME Terminal Emulator...29 // Accessing the GNOME terminal...30 // The menu bar... // Using the Konsole Terminal Emulator...35 // Accessing the Konsole terminal...35 // The menu bar...37 // Using the xterm Terminal Emulator...41 // Accessing xterm...42 // Command line parameters...43 // Summary...44 // Chapters: Basic bash Shell Commands...47 // Starting the Shell...47 // Using the Shell Prompt...48 // Interacting with the bash Manual...49 // Navigating the Filesystem...52 // Looking at the Linux filesystem...52 // Traversing directories...55
// Using absolute directory references...56 // Using relative directory references...57 // Listing Files and Directories...59 // Displaying a basic listing...59 // Displaying a long listing...61 // Filtering listing output... 62 // Handling Files...64 // Creating files...64 // Copying files...65 // Using tab auto-complete...68 // Linking files...68 // Renaming files...70 // Deleting files...72 // Managing Directories...73 // Creating directories...73 // Deleting directories...74 // Viewing File Contents...77 // Viewing the file type...77 // Viewing the whole file...78 // Using the cat command...78 // Using the more command...79 // Using the less command...80 // Viewing parts of a file...81 // Using the tail command...81 // Using the head command...82 // Summary...83 // xvi // Contents // Chapter 4: More bash Shell Commands...85 // Monitoring Programs... // Peeking at the processes... 85 // Unix-style parameters...*...86 // BSD-style parameters...89 // The GNU long parameters...91 // Real-time process monitoring...92 // Stopping processes... // The kill command...95 // The killall command...96 // Monitoring Disk Space... // Mounting media...97 // The mount command...97 // The unmount command...99 // Using the df command...?0 // Using the du command...lOi // Working with Data Files...?2 // Sorting data...102 // Searching for data...107 // Compressing data...?8 // Archiving data...HO // Summary... // Chapter 5: Understanding the Shell...113 // Exploring Shell Types...?? // Exploring
Parent and Child Shell Relationships...115 // Looking at process lists...lig // Creatively using subshells...121 // Investigating background mode...121 // Putting process lists into the background...123 // Looking at co-processing...124 // Understanding Shell Built-In Commands...125 // Looking at external commands...125 // Looking at built-in commands...127 // Using the history command...128 // Using command aliases...131 // Summary... // Chapter 6: Using Linux Environment Variables...I35 // Exploring Environment Variables...135 // Looking at global environment variables...136 // Looking at local environment variables...138 // Setting User-Defined Variables...138 // Setting local user-defined variables...139 // Contents // Setting global environment variables...140 // Removing Environment Variables...142 // Uncovering Default Shell Environment Variables...143 // Setting the PATH Environment Variable...148 // Locating System Environment Variables...150 // Understanding the login shell process...150 // Viewing the /etc/profile file...151 // Viewing the SHOME startup files...154 // Understanding the interactive shell process...156 // Understanding the non-interactive shell process...156 // Making environment variables persistent...157 // Learning about Variable Arrays...158 // Summary...159 // Chapter 7: Understanding Linux File Permissions...161 // Linux Security...161 // The /etc/passwd file...162 // The /etc/shadow file...164 // Adding a new user...164 // Removing a user...168
// Modifying a user...168 // usermod...169 // passwd and chpasswd...169 // chsh, chfn, and chage...170 // Using Linux Groups...172 // The /etc/group file...173 // Creating new groups...174 // Modifying groups...175 // Decoding File Permissions...175 // Using file permission symbols...176 // Default file permissions...177 // Changing Security Settings...179 // Changing permissions...179 // Changing ownership...181 // Sharing Files...182 // Summary...184 // Chapter 8: Managing Filesystems...187 // Exploring Linux Filesystems...187 // Understanding the basic Linux filesystems...188 // Looking at the ext filesystem...188 // Looking at the ext2 filesystem...188 // Understanding journaling filesystems...189 // Looking at the ext3 filesystem...190 // Looking at the ext4 filesystem...190 // Looking at the Reiser filesystem...190 // XVIII // Contents // Looking at the journaled filesystem...191 // Looking at the XFS filesystem...191 // Understanding the copy-on-write filesystems...192 // Looking at the ZFS filesystem...192 // Looking at the Btrfs filesystem...192 // Working with Filesystems...192 // Creating partitions...193 // Creating a filesystem...196 // Checking and repairing a filesystem...198 // Managing Logical Volumes...200 // Exploring logical volume management layout...200 // Using the LVM in Linux...201 // Taking a snapshot...202 // Striping...202 // Mirroring...202 // Using the Linux LVM...203 // Defining physical volumes...203 // Creating volume groups...205 // Creating logical
volumes...206 // Creating the filesystem...208 // Modifying the LVM...209 // Summary...210 // Chapter 9: Installing Software...211 // Package Management Primer...211 // The Debian-Based Systems...212 // Managing packages with aptitude...212 // Installing software packages with aptitude...215 // Updating software with aptitude...217 // Uninstalling software with aptitude...218 // The aptitude repositories...219 // The Red Hat-Based Systems...221 // Listing installed packages...221 // Installing software with yum...223 // Updating software with yum...224 // Uninstalling software with yum...225 // Dealing with broken dependencies...225 // Yum repositories...227 // Installing from Source Code...228 // Summary...232 // Chapter 10: Working with Editors...233 // Visiting the vim Editor...233 // Checking your vim package...234 // Exploring vim basics...235 // Editing data...238 // XIX // Contents // Copying and pasting...238 // Searching and substituting...239 // Navigating the nano Editor...240 // Exploring the emacs Editor...242 // Checking your emacs package...243 // Using emacs on the console...245 // Exploring the basics of emacs...245 // Editing data...247 // Copying and pasting...247 // Searching and replacing...248 // Using buffers in emacs...248 // Using windows in console mode emacs...249 // Using emacs in a GUI...250 // Exploring the KDE Family of Editors...251 // Looking at the KWrite editor...251 // Looking at the Kate editor...256 // Exploring the GNOME Editor...260 // Starting
gedit...260 // Understanding basic gedit features...262 // Setting preferences...262 // Setting view preferences...262 // Setting editor preferences...263 // Setting font & color preferences...264 // Managing plug-ins...264 // Summary...265 // Part II: Shell Scripting Basics 267 // Chapter 11: Basic Script Building...269 // Using Multiple Commands...269 // Creating a Script File...270 // Displaying Messages...272 // Using Variables...274 // Environment variables...274 // User variables... 275 // Command substitution...277 // Redirecting Input and Output...279 // Output redirection...279 // Input redirection...280 // Pipes...281 // Performing Math...285 // The expr command...285 // Using brackets...287 // A floating-point solution...288 // Contents // The basics of be...288 // Using be in scripts...289 // Exiting the Script...292 // Checking the exit status...292 // The exit command...293 // Summary...295 // Chapter 12: Using Structured Commands... 297 // Working with the if-then Statement...297 // Exploring the if-then-else Statement...300 // Nesting ifs... // Trying the test Command...304 // Using numeric comparisons...307 // Using string comparisons...308 // Looking at string equality...309 // Looking at string order...310 // Looking at string size...312 // Using file comparisons...313 // Checking directories...314 // Checking whether an object exists...315 // Checking for a file...316 // Checking for read access...317 // Checking for empty files...318 // Checking whether you
can write to a file...319 // Checking whether you can run a file...321 // Checking ownership...321 // Checking default group membership...322 // Checking file date...322 // Considering Compound Testing...324 // Working with Advanced if-then Features...325 // Using double parentheses...325 // Using double brackets...326 // Considering the case Command...327 // Summary... // Chapter 13: More Structured Commands...331 // The for Command... // Reading values in a list...332 // Reading complex values in a list...333 // Reading a list from a variable...335 // Reading values from a command...336 // Changing the field separator...337 // Reading a directory using wildcards...339 // The ?-Style for Command...34I // The C language for command...341 // Contents // Using multiple variables...342 // The while Command...343 // Basic while format...343 // Using multiple test commands...344 // The until Command...346 // Nesting Loops...347 // Looping on File Data...350 // Controlling the Loop...351 // The break command...352 // Breaking out of a single loop...352 // Breaking out of an inner loop...353 // Breaking out of an outer loop...354 // The continue command...355 // Processing the Output of a Loop...358 // Practical Examples...359 // Finding executable files...359 // Creating multiple user accounts...361 // Summary...362 // Chapter 14: Handling User Input...365 // Passing Parameters...365 // Reading parameters...366 // Reading the script name...368 // Testing parameters...370 // Using Special
Parameter Variables...371 // Counting parameters...371 // Grabbing all the data...373 // Being Shifty...375 // Working with Options...376 // Finding your options...376 // Processing simple options...377 // Separating options from parameters...378 // Processing options with values...379 // Using the getopt command...380 // Looking at the command format...381 // Using getopt in your scripts...382 // Advancing to getopts...384 // Standardizing Options...387 // Getting User Input...388 // Reading basics...388 // Timing out...389 // Reading with no display...391 // Reading from a file...391 // Summary...392 // XXII // Contents // Chapter 15: Presenting Data... 395 // Understanding Input and Output...395 // Standard file descriptors...395 // STDIN...396 // STD OUT...397 // STDERR...398 // Redirecting errors...398 // Redirecting errors only...398 // Redirecting errors and data...399 // Redirecting Output in Scripts...400 // Temporary redirections...400 // Permanent redirections...401 // Redirecting Input in Scripts...402 // Creating Your Own Redirection...403 // Creating output file descriptors...403 // Redirecting file descriptors...404 // Creating input file descriptors...405 // Creating a read/write file descriptor...406 // Closing file descriptors...407 // Listing Open File Descriptors...408 // Suppressing Command Output...410 // Using Temporary Files...411 // Creating a local temporary file...411 // Creating a temporary file in /tmp...413 // Creating a temporary directory...413
// Logging Messages...414 // Practical Example...416 // Summary...418 // Chapter 16: Script Control...419 // Handling Signals...419 // Signaling the bash shell...419 // Generating signals...420 // Interrupting a process...420 // Pausing a process...421 // Trapping signals...422 // Trapping a script exit...423 // Modifying or removing a trap...424 // Running Scripts in Background Mode...427 // Running in the background...427 // Running multiple background jobs... 429 // Running Scripts without a Hang-Up...430 // Controlling the Job...432 // Viewing jobs...432 // Restarting stopped jobs...434 // xxiii // Contents // Being Nice...436 // Using the nice command...436 // Using the renice command...437 // Running Like Clockwork...438 // Scheduling a job using the at command...438 // Understanding the at command format...438 // Retrieving job output...439 // Listing pending jobs...440 // Removing jobs...441 // Scheduling regular scripts...441 // Looking at the cron table...441 // Building the cron table...442 // Viewing cron directories...443 // Looking at the anacron program...443 // Starting scripts with a new shell...445 // Summary...446 // Part III: Advanced Shell Scripting 447 // Chapter 17: Creating Functions...449 // Basic Script Functions...449 // Creating a function...450 // Using functions...450 // Returning a Value...453 // The default exit status...453 // Using the return command...454 // Using function output...455 // Using Variables in Functions...456 // Passing parameters
to a function...456 // Handling variables in a function...459 // Global variables...459 // Local variables...460 // Array Variables and Functions...461 // Passing arrays to functions...461 // Returning arrays from functions...463 // Function Recursion...464 // Creating a Library...465 // Using Functions on the Command Line...467 // Creating functions on the command line...468 // Defining functions in the .bashrc file...468 // Directly defining functions...469 // Sourcing function files...469 // Following a Practical Example...470 // Downloading and installing...471 // Building the library...471 // XXIV // Contents // The shtool library functions...472 // Using the library...473 // Summary...474 // Chapter 18: Writing Scripts for Graphical Desktops...477 // Creating Text Menus...477 // Create the menu layout...478 // Create the menu functions...479 // Add the menu logic...480 // Putting it all together...481 // Using the select command...482 // Doing Windows...484 // The dialog package...484 // The msgbox widget...486 // The yesno widget...487 // The inputbox widget...487 // The textbox widget... „488 // The menu widget...489 // The fselect widget...490 // The dialog options...491 // Using the dialog command in a script...493 // Getting Graphic...496 // The KDE environment...496 // kdialog widgets...496 // Using kdialog...498 // The GNOME environment...500 // zenity widgets...500 // Using zenity in scripts...501 // Summary...504 // Chapter 19: Introducing sed and gawk...505
Manipulating Text...505 // Getting to know the sed editor...505 // Defining an editor command in the command line...506 // Using multiple editor commands in the command line...507 // Reading editor commands from a file...508 // Getting to know the gawk program...509 // Visiting the gawk command format...510 // Reading the program script from the command line...510 // Using data field variables...511 // Using multiple commands in the program script...512 // Reading the program from a file...513 // Running scripts before processing data...514 // Running scripts after processing data...514 // Commanding at the sed Editor Basics...516 // Introducing more substitution options...516 // YYX/ // Contents // Substituting flags...516 // Replacing characters...518 // Using addresses...518 // Addressing the numeric line...519 // Using text pattern filters...520 // Grouping commands...520 // Deleting lines...521 // Inserting and appending text...523 // Changing lines...525 // Transforming characters...527 // Printing revisited...527 // Printing lines...528 // Printing line numbers...529 // Listing lines...529 // Using files with sed...530 // Writing to a file...530 // Reading data from a file...531 // Summary...533 // Chapter 20: Regular Expressions...535 // What Are Regular Expressions?...535 // A definition...535 // Types of regular expressions...536 // Defining BRE Patterns...537 // Plain text...537 // Special characters...539 // Anchor characters...540 // Starting at the beginning...540
// Looking for the ending...541 // Combining anchors...542 // The dot character...542 // Character classes...543 // Negating character classes...546 // Using ranges...546 // Special character classes...547 // The asterisk...548 // Extended Regular Expressions...549 // The question mark...550 // The plus sign...551 // Using braces...551 // The pipe symbol...553 // Grouping expressions...553 // Regular Expressions in Action...554 // Counting directory files...554 // Validating a phone number...556 // Contents // Parsing an e-mail address...558 // Summary... // Chapter 21: Advanced sed...561 // Looking at Multiline Commands...561 // Navigating the next command...562 // Using the single-line next command...562 // Combining lines of text...563 // Navigating the multiline delete command...566 // Navigating the multiline print command...567 // Holding Space... // Negating a Command...569 // Changing the Flow... // Branching... // Testing... // Replacing via a Pattern... // Using the ampersand... // Replacing individual words...576 // Placing sed Commands in Scripts...577 // Using wrappers... // Redirecting sed output... // Creating sed Utilities...579 // Spacing with double lines...579 // Spacing files that may have blanks...580 // Numbering lines in a file...581 // Printing last lines...582 // Deleting lines...584 // Deleting consecutive blank lines...584 // Deleting leading blank lines...585 // Deleting trailing blank lines...586 // Removing HTML tags...586 // Summary... // Chapter
22: Advanced gawk...59I // Using Variables... // Built-in variables... // The field and record separator variables...592 // Data variables...595 // User-defined variables... // Assigning variables in scripts...598 // Assigning variables on the command line...599 // Working with Arrays...600 // Defining array variables...600 // Iterating through array variables...601 // Deleting array variables...602 // Contents // Using Patterns...602 // Regular expressions...603 // The matching operator...603 // Mathematical expressions...604 // Structured Commands...605 // The if statement...605 // The while statement...607 // The do-while statement...608 // The for statement...609 // Formatted Printing...610 // Built-In Functions...613 // Mathematical functions...613 // String functions...615 // Time functions...616 // User-Defined Functions...617 // Defining a function...617 // Using your functions...618 // Creating a function library...619 // Working through a Practical Example...620 // Summary...621 // Chapter 23: Working with Alternative Shells...623 // What Is the dash Shell?...623 // The dash Shell Features...624 // The dash command line parameters...624 // The dash environment variables...625 // Default environment variables...626 // Positional parameters...627 // User-defined environment variables...627 // The dash built-in commands...628 // Scripting in dash...629 // Creating dash scripts...629 // Things that don’t work...629 // Using arithmetic...629 // The test command...630 // The
function Command...631 // The zsh Shell...632 // Parts of the zsh Shell...632 // Shell options...632 // Built-in commands...633 // Core built-in commands...634 // Add-in modules...636 // Viewing, adding, and removing modules...637 // Scripting with zsh...638 // Mathematical operations...639 // Contents // Performing calculations...639 // Mathematical functions...640 // Structured commands...640 // Functions...641 // Summary... // Part IV: Creating Practical Scripts 643 // Chapter 24 Writing Simple Script Utilities...645 // Performing Archives...645 // Archiving data files...645 // Obtaining the required functions...646 // Creating a daily archive location...648 // Creating a daily archive script...649 // Running the daily archive script...651 // Creating an hourly archive script...652 // Running the hourly archive script...655 // Managing User Accounts...656 // Obtaining the required functions...657 // Getting the correct account name...657 // Creating a function to get the correct account name...658 // Verifying the entered account name...660 // Determining whether the account exists...661 // Removing any account processes...662 // Finding account files...664 // Removing the account...665 // Creating the script...665 // Running the script...671 // Monitoring Disk Space...673 // Obtaining the required functions...673 // Creating the script...676 // Running the script...677 // Summary... // Chapter 25: Producing Scripts for Database, Web, and E-Mail...681 // Using a MySQL Database...
// Using MySQL... // Connecting to the server...682 // The mysql commands...683 // Creating a database...685 // Creating a user account...687 // Creating a table...688 // Inserting and deleting data...690 // Contents // Querying data...691 // Using the database in your scripts...692 // Logging into the server...692 // Sending commands to the server...693 // Formatting data...696 // Using the Web...697 // Installing Lynx...698 // The lynx command line...699 // The Lynx configuration file...700 // Capturing data from Lynx...701 // Using E-Mail...704 // Summary...708 // Chapter 26: Creating Fun Little Shell Scripts...709 // Sending a Message...709 // Understanding the required functions...709 // Determining who is on the system...710 // Allowing messages...710 // Sending a message to another user...711 // Creating the script...712 // Checking if user is logged on...713 // Checking if user accepts messages...714 // Checking if message was included...715 // Transmitting a simple message...715 // Transmitting a long message...716 // Obtaining a Quote...720 // Understanding the required functions...720 // Learning about the wget utility...720 // Testing a web address...723 // Creating the script...724 // Checking the passed URL...724 // Obtaining web page information...726 // Parsing out the desired information...727 // Generating an Excuse...731 // Understanding the required functions...732 // Learning about curl...732 // Choosing to use e-mail...734 // Creating the script...735
Summary...737 // Appendix A: Quick Guide to bash Commands...739 // Appendix B: Quick Guide to sed and gawk...751 // Index...763
(OCoLC)910936447

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