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EB
EB
ONLINE
Second edition.
Amsterdam : Newnes is an imprint of Elsevier, 2016.
1 online zdroj : illustrations
Externí odkaz    ScienceDirect: Plný text PDF 
   * Návod pro vzdálený přístup 


ISBN 9780080971360 ((ebook))
ISBN 0080971369 ((ebook))
ISBN 0080971296
ISBN 9780080971292
ISBN !9780080971292 (chyb.)
Tištěná verze : Wilson, Peter. Design recipes for FPGAs. Second edition. Amsterdam, [Netherlands] : Newnes, ©2016 xix, 369 pages ISBN 9780080971292
Obsahuje bibliografické odkazy a rejstřík.
pt. 1 OVERVIEW -- ch. 1 Introduction -- 1.1. Overview -- 1.2. Verilog vs. VHDL -- 1.3. Why FPGAs? -- 1.4. Summary -- ch. 2 An FPGA Primer -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. FPGA Evolution -- 2.3. Programmable Logic Devices -- 2.4. Field Programmable Gate Arrays -- 2.5. FPGA Design Techniques -- 2.6. Design Constraints using FPGAs -- 2.7. Development Kits and Boards -- 2.8. Summary -- ch. 3 A VHDL Primer: The Essentials -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Entity: Model Interface -- 3.2.1. The Entity Definition -- 3.2.2. Ports -- 3.2.3. Generics -- 3.2.4. Constants -- 3.2.5. Entity Examples -- 3.3. Architecture: Model Behavior -- 3.3.1. Basic Definition of An Architecture -- 3.3.2. Architecture Declaration Section -- 3.3.3. Architecture Statement Section -- 3.4. Process: Basic Functional Unit in VHDL -- 3.5. Basic Variable Types and Operators -- 3.5.1. Constants -- 3.5.2. Signals -- 3.5.3. Variables -- 3.5.4. Boolean Operators -- 3.5.5. Arithmetic Operators -- 3.5.6.Comparison Operators.
3.5.7. Logical Shifting Functions -- 3.5.8. Concatenation -- 3.6. Decisions and Loops -- 3.6.1. If-Then-Else -- 3.6.2. Case -- 3.6.3. For -- 3.6.4. While and Loop -- 3.6.5. Exit -- 3.6.6. Next -- 3.7. Hierarchical Design -- 3.7.1. Functions -- 3.7.2. Packages -- 3.7.3.Components -- 3.7.4. Procedures -- 3.8. Debugging Models -- 3.8.1. Assertions -- 3.9. Basic Data Types -- 3.9.1. Basic Types -- 3.9.2. Data Type: bit -- 3.9.3. Data Type: Boolean -- 3.9.4. Data Type: Integer -- 3.9.5. Integer Subtypes: Natural -- 3.9.6. Integer Subtypes: Positive -- 3.9.7. Data Type: Character -- 3.9.8. Data Type: Real -- 3.9.9. Data Type: Time -- 3.10. Summary -- ch. 4 A Verilog Primer: The Essentials -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Modules -- 4.3. Connections -- 4.4. Wires and Registers -- 4.5. Defining the Module Behavior -- 4.6. Parameters -- 4.7. Variables -- 4.8. Data Types -- 4.9. Decision Making -- 4.10. Loops -- 4.11. Summary -- ch. 5 Design Automation of FPGAs -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Simulation.
5.2.1. Simulators -- 5.2.2. Test Benches -- 5.2.3. Test Bench Goals -- 5.2.4. Simple Test Bench: Instantiating Components -- 5.2.5. Adding Stimuli -- 5.2.6. Assertions -- 5.3. Libraries -- 5.3.1. Introduction -- 5.3.2. Using Libraries -- 5.3.3. Std_logic Libraries -- 5.4.std_logic Type Definition -- 5.5. Synthesis -- 5.5.1. Design Flow for Synthesis -- 5.5.2. Synthesis Issues -- 5.6. RTL Design Flow -- 5.7. Physical Design Flow -- 5.8. Place and Route -- 5.8.1. Recursive Cut -- 5.8.2. Simulated Annealing -- 5.9. Timing Analysis -- 5.10. Design Pitfalls -- 5.10.1. Initialization -- 5.10.2. Floating Point Numbers and Operations -- 5.11. Summary -- ch. 6 Synthesis -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.1.1. HDL Supported in RTL Synthesis -- 6.2. Numeric Types -- 6.3. Wait Statements -- 6.4. Assertions -- 6.5. Loops -- 6.6. Some Interesting Cases Where Synthesis May Fail -- 6.7. What Is Being Synthesized? -- 6.7.1. Overall Design Structure -- 6.7.2. Controller -- 6.7.3. Data Path -- 6.8. Summary.
pt. 2 INTRODUCTION TO FPGA APPLICATIONS -- ch. 7 High Speed Video Application -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. The Camera Link Interface -- 7.2.1. Hardware Interface -- 7.2.2. Data Rates -- 7.2.3. The Bayer Pattern -- 7.2.4. Memory Requirements -- 7.3. Getting Started -- 7.4. Specifying the Interfaces -- 7.5. Defining the Top Level Design -- 7.6. System Block Definitions and Interfaces -- 7.6.1. Overall System Decomposition -- 7.6.2. Mouse and Keyboard Interfaces -- 7.6.3. Memory Interface -- 7.6.4. The Display Interface: VGA -- 7.7. The Camera Link Interface -- 7.8. The PC Interface -- 7.9. Summary -- ch. 8 Simple Embedded Processors -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2.A Simple Embedded Processor -- 8.2.1. Embedded Processor Architecture -- 8.2.2. Basic Instructions -- 8.2.3. Fetch Execute Cycle -- 8.2.4. Embedded Processor Register Allocation -- 8.2.5.A Basic Instruction Set -- 8.2.6. Structural or Behavioral? -- 8.2.7. Machine Code Instruction Set.
8.2.8. Structural Elements of the Microprocessor -- 8.3.A Simple Embedded Processor Implemented in VHDL -- 8.3.1. Processor Functions Package -- 8.3.2. The Program Counter -- 8.3.3. The Instruction Register -- 8.3.4. The Arithmetic and Logic Unit -- 8.3.5. The Memory -- 8.3.6. Microcontroller Controller -- 8.3.7. Summary of a Simple Microprocessor Implemented in VHDL -- 8.4.A Simple Embedded Processor Implemented in Verilog -- 8.4.1. The Program Counter -- 8.4.2. The Instruction Register -- 8.4.3. Memory Data Register -- 8.4.4. Memory Address Register -- 8.4.5. The Arithmetic and Logic Unit -- 8.4.6. The Memory -- 8.4.7. Microcontroller Controller -- 8.4.8. Summary of a Simple Verilog Microprocessor -- 8.5. Soft Core Processors on an FPGA -- 8.6. Summary -- pt. 3 DESIGNER’S TOOLBOX -- ch. 9 Digital Filters -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Converting S Domain to Z Domain -- 9.3. Implementing Z Domain Functions in VHDL -- 9.3.1. Introduction -- 9.3.2. Gain Block.
9.3.3. Sum and Difference -- 9.3.4. Division Model -- 9.3.5. Unit Delay Model -- 9.4. Basic Low Pass Filter Model -- 9.5. Implementing Z Domain Functions in Verilog -- 9.5.1. Gain Block -- 9.5.2. Sum and Difference -- 9.5.3. Unit Delay Model -- 9.6. Finite Impulse Response Filters -- 9.7. Infinite Impulse Response Filters -- 9.8. Summary -- ch. 10 Secure Systems -- 10.1. Introduction to Block Ciphers -- 10.2. Feistel Lattice Structures -- 10.3. The Data Encryption Standard (DES) -- 10.3.1. Introduction -- 10.3.2. DES VHDL Implementation -- 10.3.3. DES Verilog Implementation -- 10.3.4. Validation of DES -- 10.4. Advanced Encryption Standard -- 10.4.1. Implementing AES in VHDL -- 10.5. Summary -- ch. 11 Memory -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Modeling Memory in HDLs -- 11.3. Read Only Memory -- 11.4. Random Access Memory -- 11.5. Synchronous RAM -- 11.6. Flash Memory -- 11.7. Summary -- ch. 12 PS/2 Mouse Interface -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. PS/2 Mouse Basics.
12.3. PS/2 Mouse Commands -- 12.4. PS/2 Mouse Data Packets -- 12.5. PS/2 Operation Modes -- 12.6. PS/2 Mouse with Wheel -- 12.7. Basic PS/2 Mouse Handler VHDL -- 12.8. Modified PS/2 Mouse Handler VHDL -- 12.9. Basic PS/2 Mouse Handler in Verilog -- 12.10. Summary -- ch. 13 PS/2 Keyboard Interface -- 13.1. Introduction -- 13.2. PS/2 Keyboard Basics -- 13.3. PS/2 Keyboard Commands -- 13.4. PS/2 Keyboard Data Packets -- 13.5. PS/2 Keyboard Operation Modes -- 13.5.1. Basic PS/2 Keyboard Handler in VHDL -- 13.5.2. Modified PS/2 Keyboard Handler in VHDL -- 13.5.3. Basic PS/2 Keyboard Handler in Verilog -- 13.6. Summary -- ch. 14 A Simple VGA Interface -- 14.1. Introduction -- 14.2. Basic Pixel Timing -- 14.3. Image Handling -- 14.4.A VGA Interface in VHDL -- 14.4.1. VHDL Top Level Entity for VGA Handling -- 14.4.2. Horizontal Sync -- 14.4.3. Vertical Sync -- 14.4.4. Horizontal and Vertical Blanking Pulses -- 14.4.5. Calculating the Correct Pixel Data.
14.5.A VGA Interface in Verilog -- 14.5.1. Verilog Top Level Module for VGA Handling -- 14.5.2. Horizontal Sync -- 14.5.3. Vertical Sync -- 14.5.4. Horizontal and Vertical Blanking Pulses -- 14.5.5. Calculating the Correct Pixel Data -- 14.6. Summary -- ch. 15 Serial Communications -- 15.1. Introduction -- 15.2. Manchester Encoding and Decoding -- 15.3. Implementing the Manchester Encoding Scheme using VHDL -- 15.4. Implementing the Manchester Encoding Scheme using Verilog -- 15.5. NRZ (Non-Return-to-Zero) Coding and Decoding -- 15.6. NRZI (Non-Return-to-Zero-Inverted) Coding and Decoding -- 15.6.1. NRZI Coding and Decoding in VHDL -- 15.6.2. NRZI Coding and Decoding in Verilog -- 15.7. RS-232 -- 15.7.1. Introduction -- 15.7.2. RS-232 Baud Rate Generator -- 15.7.3. RS-232 Receiver -- 15.8. Universal Serial Bus -- 15.9. Summary -- pt. 4 OPTIMIZING DESIGNS -- ch. 16 Design Optimization -- 16.1. Introduction -- 16.2. Techniques for Logic Optimization.
16.3. Improving Performance -- 16.4. Critical Path Analysis -- 16.5. Summary -- ch. 17 Behavioral Modeling in using HDLs -- 17.1. Introduction -- 17.2. How to Go from RTL to Behavioral HDL Descriptions -- 17.3. Implementing the Behavioral Model using VHDL -- 17.4. Implementing the Behavioral Model using Verilog -- 17.5. Summary -- ch. 18 Mixed Signal Modeling -- 18.1. Introduction -- 18.2. Basic Modeling Approach for VHDL-AMS -- 18.3. Introduction to VHDL-AMS -- 18.4. VHDL-AMS Analog Pins: TERMINALS -- 18.5. Mixed Domain Modeling -- 18.6. VHDL-AMS Analog Variables: Quantities -- 18.7. Simultaneous Equations in VHDL-AMS -- 18.8.A VHDL-AMS Example: A DC Voltage Source -- 18.9.A VHDL-AMS Example: Resistor -- 18.10. Differential Equations in VHDL-AMS -- 18.11. Mixed-Signal Modeling with VHDL-AMS -- 18.12.A Basic Switch Model -- 18.13. Basic VHDL-AMS Comparator Model -- 18.14. Multiple Domain Modeling -- 18.15. Introduction to Verilog-AMS -- 18.16. Verilog-AMS: Analog ports.
18.17. Mixed Domain Modeling in Verilog-AMS -- 18.18. Verilog-AMS Analog Variables -- 18.19. Verilog-AMS Analog Equations -- 18.20.A Verilog-AMS Example -- 18.20.1. DC Voltage Source -- 18.20.2. Resistor -- 18.21. Differential Equations in Verilog-AMS -- 18.22. Mixed Signal Modeling with Verilog-AMS -- 18.23. Multiple Domain Modeling using Verilog-AMS -- 18.24. Summary -- ch. 19 Design Optimization Example: DES -- 19.1. Introduction -- 19.2. The Data Encryption Standard -- 19.3. MOODS -- 19.4. Initial Design -- 19.4.1. Introduction -- 19.4.2. Overall Structure -- 19.4.3. Data Transformations -- 19.4.4. Key Transformations -- 19.5. Initial Synthesis -- 19.6. Optimizing the Datapath -- 19.6.1. Optimizing the Key Transformations -- 19.7. Final Optimization -- 19.8. Results -- 19.9. Triple DES -- 19.9.1. Introduction -- 19.9.2. Minimum Area Iterative -- 19.9.3. Minimum Latency Pipelined -- 19.10.Comparing the Approaches -- 19.11. Summary -- References -- pt. 5 FUNDAMENTAL TECHNIQUES.
Ch. 20 Latches, Flip-Flops, and Registers -- 20.1. Introduction -- 20.2. Latches -- 20.3. Flip-Flops -- 20.4. Registers -- 20.5. Summary -- ch. 21 ALU Functions -- 21.1. Introduction -- 21.2. Logic Functions in VHDL -- 21.2.1.1-bit Adder -- 21.3. Structural n-Bit Addition -- 21.4. Logic Functions in Verilog -- 21.5. Configurable n-Bit Addition -- 21.6. Two’s Complement -- 21.7. Summary -- ch. 22 Finite State Machines in VHDL and Verilog -- 22.1. Introduction -- 22.2. State Transition Diagrams -- 22.3. Implementing Finite State Machines in VHDL -- 22.4. Implementing Finite State Machines in Verilog -- 22.5. Testing the Finite State Machine Model -- 22.6. Summary -- ch. 23 Fixed Point Arithmetic -- 23.1. Introduction -- 23.2. Basic Fixed Point Types in VHDL -- 23.3. Fixed Point Functions in VHDL -- 23.3.1. Fixed Point to STD_LOGIC_VECTOR Functions -- 23.3.2. Fixed Point to Real Conversion -- 23.4. Testing the VHDL Fixed Point Functions -- 23.5. Fixed Point Types in Verilog.
23.6. Floating Point Types in Verilog -- 23.7. Summary -- ch. 24 Counters -- 24.1. Introduction -- 24.2. Basic Binary Counter using VHDL -- 24.3. Simple Binary Counter using Verilog -- 24.4. Synthesized Simple Binary Counter -- 24.5. Shift Register -- 24.6. The Johnson Counter -- 24.7. BCD Counter -- 24.8. Summary -- ch. 25 Decoders and Multiplexers -- 25.1. Decoders -- 25.2. Multiplexers -- 25.3. Summary -- ch. 26 Multiplication -- 26.1. Introduction -- 26.2. Basic Binary Multiplication -- 26.3. VHDL Unsigned Multiplier -- 26.4. Synthesis of the Multiplication Function -- 26.5. Simple Multiplication using VHDL -- 26.6. Simple Multiplication using Verilog -- 26.7. Summary -- ch. 27 Simple 7-Segment (LCD) Displays -- 27.1. Introduction -- 27.2. VHDL LCD Module Decoder -- 27.3. Verilog LCD Module Decoder -- 27.4. Summary.
This book provides a rich toolbox of design techniques and templates to solve practical, every-day problems using FPGAs. Using a modular structure, it provides design techniques and templates at all levels, together with functional code, which you can easily match and apply to your application. Written in an informal and easy to grasp style, this invaluable resource goes beyond the principles of FPGAs and hardware description languages to demonstrate how specific designs can be synthesized, simulated and downloaded onto an FPGA. In addition, the book provides advanced techniques to create ’real world’ designs that fit the device required and which are fast and reliable to implement..
Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed October 6, 2015).
001483064
(OCoLC)922698101

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